Posts Tagged ‘Education’

Questions Of Importance & A Quiz

Tuesday, November 19th, 2019

1. What year was ICC incorporated?

a. 1976
b. 1978
c. 1981

2. How many children have you helped through your support since ICC began?

a. 4,112
b. 5,217
c. 3,921

3. What is the average cost of one meal for one child living in one of the children’s villages?

a. $1.13
b. $0.71
c. $2.11

4. What percentage of the yearly financial needs for the children are given during the month of December?

a. 17%
b. 33%
c. 23%

Answers to the Quiz:

Question 1 = B
Question 2 = A
Question 3 = B
Question 4 = C

Questions Of Importance

A photo of Doug Congleton with several of the children from the Las Palmas Children’s Village in the Dominican Republic

Doug Congleton with ICC kids

I hope you enjoyed learning more about the children of ICC by taking a few moments and going through the “ICC Informational Quiz” above.

It’s always fun and rewarding to learn more about the lives of the children and what is all involved in their various programs.

I hope that one of the questions of importance that stood out to you in the informational quiz was the fact that December is such an important month for the children as far as yearly funding is concerned.

There is no other month that means more to the children than December does, this month actually decides if we even have children’s villages in the coming year.

Yes, it is important for the children. When you think about 23% of the total year’s donations coming in the month of December, it is vitally important!

Isn’t it ironic that we always celebrate the birth of Jesus at this time of year, and now it is also the same time of year that decides how His Kids lives will be saved and changed as well? Just think about that.

I am asking you to prayerfully consider your year-end giving plan this next month to include a very special gift for His kids.

This has been a difficult year financially for all of the projects. We are doing everything we can to try to shore up the financial pillars of each project.

This year we have given lots of effort and time into developing industries at the children’s villages in order to help them financially contribute by offsetting some of their ever-increasing budgets.

This is starting to help, but we just started these efforts, and we are far from making the difference we hope to make in the future.

These efforts take money to initiate, and as always, we work very hard to be good stewards of what comes in for the children. This is why you see an occasional special request letter asking to help support a specific industry in a children’s village.

We always want to make sure that we spend every dollar wisely for its intended purpose.

I also want to thank each one of you for your continued, faithful support on behalf of the children. Your love and support are what keeps the doors open, food on the table, and most importantly, hope for today and a heavenly home for the futures of His kids.

God bless you for everything that you continue to do for the children. I am so excited for the day when they can walk up to you in our heavenly home and thank you personally for what you have done for them each day while we are on this earth. That will be such a special moment for me, and an amazing and rewarding moment for you!

In Service for His kids,

Doug Congleton's Signature

 

 

 

Doug Congleton

Because Of You 3 Kids Have New Families

Tuesday, November 12th, 2019

These kids are thankful you gave them their new family

Thanksgiving offers us a season to reflect and be truly grateful for the way God has touched and blessed our lives.

For orphan children like Raji, Marissa, and Henri they are truly grateful for the blessings you bring to them all year long!

This is Raji

This is Raji

Raji has been through a lot in his young life. In order to provide for his family, Raji’s father went to a distant state in India for a welding job. He had to leave behind his wife, Raji and his younger brother.

But the job was a good one and it offered good wages. Raji’s father was only able to visit home once or twice a year and this wasn’t enough to keep the home fires of love burning brightly.

Raji’s mother developed a relationship with another man. When Raji’s father returned home the next time, his wife refused to live with him. She no longer wanted him nor Raji or his brother.

The breakup of this home was devastating. The mother didn’t want Raji, and the father was more like a stranger than a father. He couldn’t keep his job and keep the boys. As is often the case, the broken life of a child is the sad result of a broken marriage.

Raji’s father begged us to accept the boys into our care. And knowing of the compassionate heart that you and other ICC family members have for children like Raji, who need the nurturing care of a loving Christian family, our administrator welcomed Raji and his little brother into the ICC family.

This is Marissa

This is Marissa

Marissa, along with her siblings, was found wandering the streets of a city in Guatemala. As a result of a court order, they became a part of the ICC family at Los Pinos.
Efforts were made to locate family members. When the authorities found out the mother was not working in a reputable occupation and was not providing any care for

Marissa and her siblings were taken into care by the government.

These children were initially sent to one children’s home and then another before finally becoming a part of our ICC family.

Joel Carpio, our Los Pinos director, knew of the emotional and psychological trauma the children had experienced from being moved around. Rather than letting the children be dropped off yet again at another facility, he arranged to pick them up himself and drive them to the Los Pinos Children’s Village.

They had a pleasant trip with him and were excited and full of joy as soon as they arrived. That day was the Father’s Day celebration and they became very involved in the program. That day Marissa and her siblings began to experience first-hand what it means to be a part of a loving family—with a mom and dad.

Imagine coming to the Los Pinos campus when the families were celebrating fathers. Marissa’s own father was not a part of her life. Yet, thanks to ICC family members like you, she can now experience the love of an earthly father. And more importantly, within the ICC family, she will learn of her heavenly father and the home He is preparing for her.

This is Henri

This is Henri

Henri’s mother died as a result of being caught up in the war between rebels and government forces in the D.R. Congo. His father is blind and had no way to protect Henri or provide for him.

Henri’s story is similar to other children who have come to us from this country filled with violence and natural disasters.

War tears children from their mother’s arms. And the children are left with little hope and nothing to live for unless help comes from outside.

And again, thanks to your support, Henri has been given a new life within the ICC family at Patmos Children’s Village. And the pieces of his life are being slowly put back together.

Through the support of ICC family members like you, Raji, Marissa, and Henri have found a place of safety and a place to belong. They are thankful for the blessings you help to provide for them each day.

World Orphan Day Spotlights the Plight of Orphans

November 11 is World Orphan Day. On this day, many people around the world will be paying special attention to the needs of orphans. We are so very grateful that you care about orphans, not just on November 11, but every day of the year!

Your loving and generous support makes it possible for our dedicated family of caregivers to provide all that Raji, Marissa and Henri and others like them need.
These children don’t really care about a day of the year that focuses on their needs. What they need is daily care. That is only possible as you continue to partner with us to love them and provide for them.

As we celebrate this year’s Thanksgiving holiday here in the U.S., we’ll be reminded of the bountiful blessings God has given to us throughout another year — good health (or at least access to quality health care), loving family relationships, opportunities to grow, develop and succeed.

As we reflect upon those blessings God’s given during this Thanksgiving season, please consider giving a special thank you gift to help support children like Raji, Marissa, and Henri who are finding out what it means to be a part of a loving family.

Thank you!

May God bless you with a Happy Thanksgiving!

10 Facts You Didn’t Know About Idjwi Island

Tuesday, November 5th, 2019

By William Hurtado

An aerial map showing Idjwi Island and the surrounding area.“Africans, we are lucky.”Jacques Sebisaho, MD, speaking at a Ted Talk, continues; “We have other creative minds that are focusing their efforts, wealth, and education to make our continent a better world. We are grateful to have them help us.”

Jacques is from one of the remotest places in Africa: Idjwi island on Lake Kivu between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Rwanda. The Patmos Children’s Village is located there and is home to 164 orphans supported by contributors like you.

While neighboring countries have endured wars and violence, Idjwi has remained a peaceful oasis for around 260,000 people. But when Sebisaho returned to Idjwi, he was shattered by what he saw and called “a forgotten place.”

Idjwi Island, the size of Atlanta, GA or Portland, OR has no electricity except through generators and solar panels, and much of the island lacks potable drinking water and paved roads.

As Sebisaho built a hospital on Idjwi to help relieve his people’s medical needs, he realized that helping Africans is more than financial. It is partnering with the right organizations who help natives maximize their own strength and creativity.

In his Ted Talk Sebisaho concluded, “today, I would like to introduce to you the less known creative minds that are also solving Africa’s problems. The women, the pygmies, and children. These are the people I know. While they are grateful for all of the great minds, all of the wealthy and educated people who are focusing on Africa, they are in themselves a powerful solution to their problems.” When their creativity is empowered, there are no limits.

A photo of Munaneza while he was living at the Patmos Children's Village on Idjwi IslandAnd that, ICC ministry partner, is what you do every time you support ICC’s children. Whether it be in Africa, Central America, or a country in between, every dollar you give translates to empowerment for a once-orphaned child. Through your faithful gifts, you give children, like Munyaneza, a new life.

Recently, I connected with Munyaneza Louis from the D.R. Congo. He says, “l’m at Patmos on Idjwi Island now. God is our protector.”

Munyaneza was taken to the Patmos Children’s Village after he lost his parents in an accident.

There he was cared for and given the opportunity to become educated. Even though the old school building at Patmos needed serious updating, the children still received an education that helped Munyaneza eventually become a nurse.

A photo of Munyaneza while he was training to become a nurseThis year Munyaneza finished nurses training and is ready to help people in his country. He is giving back. Through people like you, he is achieving so much! What he recently wrote to me he writes to you. “I’m your child.”

Munyaneza is one of many stories of children growing up into Christ-likeness from the 41 years of faithful giving from donors like you. You make stories like this possible!
You make an eternal difference in the lives of children. The investments of money and time you make are considered “pure and undefiled religion” by our Heavenly Father.

Thank you so much for taking the time to be His hands and feet. It is true — Your gifts save and empower lives!

P.S. Were you able to find 10 interesting facts about Idjwi Island? Try sharing them with a friend! You never know, through your encouragement and their new support, all of us may be hugging more children in Heaven soon.

Urgent Equipment Needs @ Los Pinos

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2019

Guatemala Needs Your Help

An illustration of an elderly, ill, stone-age computer being evaluated by a computer “doctor.”Remember the last time your old, slow, but still somewhat trusty-ish computer suddenly wheezed its last, went blue in the screen, and simply gave up?

Leaving you having to acquire (before you were really ready) a current, functioning computer?

It’s during events such as these that we’re abruptly reminded (and probably not for the first time) how important it is to have up-to-date techology to sucessfully function in today’s world.

Like you, the staff at our Los Pinos Children’s Village in Guatemala also need and benefit from computers and tech equipment that is up-to-date and functions properly.

Los Pinos needs to replace three computers. The current computers are old, outdated, and do not function properly. New computers will help the project secretary, the accountant, and the school manage information about the children for the Secretary of Education.

Two video projectors are needed as well to replace one projector for the school and another projector used by the Los Pinos on-campus social worker and psychologist.

Please make a gift today to help purchase one or more of these much-needed and necessary technolgy items for your family at Los Pinos.

Thank you!

2 Computers — $878 Each For the Los Pinos office staff

1 Laptop — $649 For the children’s
 school records

2 Video Projectors — $621 Each For our school and on-campus social workers

School is in Session on El Oasis Campus

Tuesday, October 15th, 2019

Much of the recent news we’ve shared about ICC’s El Oasis project in Mexico has centered on the growth of the Jalapeño pepper project. God continues to bless, and the little seeds have sprung up into a successful crop that is still being harvested.

While the pepper project is one way that God has blessed us in helping to provide for the children, agriculture is not ICC’s primary focus. It’s the children! They are like growing plants that have such potential to be a part of the harvest that Jesus will take with Him to Heaven. And one way that the children grow best, is to have them experience quality education.

School has recently started for ICC children at El Oasis, and we’re excited to report that the children are attending their classes at the school on campus.

A photo of the school facility on the El Oasis campus in Mexico

Even though a school facility has been provided on campus through the generosity of the Malcolm Smith Foundation, it just hasn’t been feasible for ICC to operate the school. It has been very difficult to obtain the necessary approvals from the government.

However, ICC’s model of care is best realized, and the children flourish best in a school program that accommodates for their special needs. A campus school provides a safe and nurturing environment for the children.

With that in mind, the El Oasis administrative team has been trying to find a way to make this possible. And this year, through God’s blessing, we can operate a type of home school program on campus. Students in the lower grades are enrolled in a school some distance away and students in the upper grades are enrolled in a different school. Under the supervision of El Oasis staff, the children will take their class work on campus and will only have to travel to the school in which they are enrolled to take standardized tests.

This is a huge blessing for the children!

In time we hope to be able to grow the program further so that we can operate the school on campus for the benefit of the children.

Please pray that God will bless the children this school year as they daily engage in their studies on campus. Thank you!

The Impact Of Your Support

Tuesday, September 17th, 2019

An interview with Huridis Fortuna, one of ICC’s grown children

} By Makala James

Huridis’ life changed forever when he came to live at Las Palmas Children’s Village in the Dominican Republic.

He flourished, earned his degree in Theology, married the love of his life, Hannah, and is now serving in ministry and sharing the Gospel

I recently had the opportunity to speak with Huridis about his experience growing up as an ICC kid.

A special thank you to Huridis for sharing his story about his experience at Las Palmas! God will continue to use Huridis in wonderful ways, just as He is working in the lives of all ICC children. Makala James [left] sits with Huridis Fortuna [right] in Keen, Texas. Makala had the opportunity to speak with Huridis about his life before, and while, Huridis was growing up at the Las Palmas Children’s Village.

Makala James [left] sits with Huridis Fortuna [right] in Keen, Texas. Makala had the opportunity to speak with Huridis about his life before, and while, Huridis was growing up at the Las Palmas Children’s Village.

Did you have a difficult childhood before coming to the Las Palmas Children’s Village?

I had a rough childhood. There is an illustration that I use in my sermons.

How do you purify gold? It’s with fire. It’s a hard and long process, but in the end what you get is fine, pure gold. Whatever happened in my life as a child, I see as a blessing. God used that to make me the person I am today.

What do you remember of your first day at Las Palmas?

My first day at the orphanage, I arrived with a little backpack, a pair of pants, a pair of socks, and a shirt. That’s all I brought because I had nothing else.

The director said, “Where are your clothes?” She was surprised that I didn’t have anything. After meeting my teacher and classmates, we went to the warehouse and got a bunch of clothes and shoes. I got a pillow that is kind of like a race car, and I still keep that with me today.

Then, I heard that everyone at the church and village had been praying for me. They did not know me, but everyone was praying for me to get there. I was amazed!

How did the children’s village affect your spiritual life?

Certainly, it made a big impact on my life. I still remember how, to wake us up, the dad of the house would play Christian music in the living room. That would be the time for us to gather around the table for worship.

We would sing songs, study the bible, pray, and have worship together as a family. That helped me have a deeper relationship with Jesus. Not only that, but we were also encouraged to have our own personal time reading the bible and praying.

After you finished worship, what was a typical day like?

On a typical day in high school, which was the best time, we would wake up in the morning to have worship together. Then we would do our chores, such as cleaning the bathroom or bedroom or yard… Whatever was assigned to us.

Afterwards, we would get ready for school and eat breakfast. Breakfast might be yucca with cheese or plantains and eggs, maybe cereal, fruit, and milk.

We attended school, and then came home around lunch time. After an hour break for lunch, then we had two hours of work, required of everybody.

After work I would either do homework or go to music school to practice the cello. In the evening, we had dinner and evening worship as a family.

Did you always stay in the same family?

I stayed with the same family for my whole time at the orphanage until I turned 18. That year we separated from the younger children, but still remained in the same family.

I helped the younger kids with their homework and chores at home. We moved to a bigger house because the house we were living in was kind of small. It was the same family all the time.

Tell me about an ICC sibling to whom you still feel close?

Alexandra! When I first arrived at the orphanage we used to fight and argue. Now we are really good friends. She came to my wedding two years ago when I got married. She’s coming to visit again, and we keep in touch.

How does having an advanced education impact your life?

It certainly makes a difference when you get an education. Seeing it from a professional point of view, we live in a competitive world.

If you have no education, then you are behind. It’s really hard for you to find a job and survive.

Because of my education, I am able to serve and support ICC, to give back to the place that helped me to become who I am.

Share a bit about when you felt called to ministry?

When I look back to my childhood and to what I’ve been through in my life, how God rescued me from what I could have been, it’s like a calling. It’s like God telling me, “I want you for a special mission.”

That helps me to understand that I’ve been called for something special. Once I was at [Las Palmas], I kept growing in my faith and in my relationship with Jesus. I participated in church and everybody used to call me pastorcito, which means little pastor.

I didn’t want to be pastor, because, honestly, I was afraid! But I grew up and felt called in many ways. I realized, God can use my life and story.

How did your life change when you were accepted into the ICC family?

It was a big change. I got my education and things that I needed right there. For me, it was all I ever wanted. It was my family.

I understand that you and your wife sponsor a child. Can you tell me about that?

We do! Actually, we’re in the process of getting a second one. We visited our sponsorship child. He was really happy when we went to see him. When we got home, we wrote a letter and sent a photo to him of all of us.

When you were a child, did it matter when sponsors wrote you or sent you pictures?

It’s very important to write to the children. I felt special when a sponsor wrote me. I felt I was connecting with my sponsor. It was easier to reply to that person, especially when they’d sent me pictures and asked me questions.

How do the ICC children who are now adults relate to the children’s village?

We have a group of generation that comes together like an alumni association, and there’s a president. We gather money and donations to take to the children’s village. We come together at Christmas, and put on a Christmas program. Recently, we raised funds for school shoes.

Why is it important to do these things for the kids?

I went there and I received help. Once I grew up, I realized how important it was that someone helped me, that someone raised money for me to eat and go to school. It’s heart touching to do the same for those children who are also in need.

 

 

Educating For A Brighter Future — Thanks To You

Tuesday, September 10th, 2019
This is Claudia. She recently graduated university with her degree in Marketing and International Business. Claudia grew up at the Hogar Escuela Adventista Children’s Village in El Salvador. Because of people like you, Claudia was able to obtain not only her primary and secondary education, but an advanced degree as well. It is through your support and investment in the future of these children that they are able to receive their education. Education is an investment that will pay dividends now and for eternity.

This is Claudia. Because of people like you, Claudia was able to obtain her advanced degree in business.

Your generous support helps provide quality education for ICC’s children.

Whether it’s four of our girls attending the Adventist high school in Romania, or grown-up children finishing their university degrees in India, Ghana, the Dominican Republic, Mexico and Guatemala, or the more than 100 children in the D.R. Congo who are engaged in various levels of instruction, the ICC education program is a ticket to a brighter future — for this world and the world to come.

Claudia is a good example of this. Claudia was only four when she came to live at our Hogar Escuela Adventista (HEA) Children’s Village in El Salvador.

Her father had abandoned the family, and her mother was losing the battle of trying to provide a safe environment for Claudia and her younger brother.

Claudia grew up within the HEA family. She attended elementary and secondary school and was involved in the church program on campus. She believed that a daily relationship with God helped her to make good decisions.

Through the generous support of the ICC family, Claudia was able to enroll in University in 2013. She majored in Marketing and International Business. During her studies, she was twice given the opportunity to travel to the United States for an internship. This was a reward for her good grades.

However, both times she declined the offer because of possible Sabbath conflicts and because of the cost it would have meant to her ICC family while living abroad.

Claudia recently graduated with her degree. She is a testimony to the outcome of your support!

As another school year begins, it reminds us all of the import role that education plays in the lives of children like Claudia.

The cost of education is not cheap. Neither is the cost of ignorance. Your investment in the lives of the children’s education is paying divides now and for eternity.

Please consider making an extra special gift this month in support of education for a child like Claudia. May God bless you for all you do for the children!

Should Lucas Quit Or Beat Leukemia?

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2019

by William Hurtado

Lucas with one of his Lego creationsLucas Nelson, at 13 years of age, was diagnosed on August 25, 2018 with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

He was supposed to be playing freely as a child; but now he had fevers, easy bruising, abnormal weight loss, and cancerous blood cells growing inside his body. Would he survive chemotherapy and find a way to break past the exhaustion?

Lucas lives with his family in North Dakota. His parents are Seventh-day Adventist conference workers within the education and youth ministries.

Through this calamity, the family could have easily become angry with God and distanced themselves, but instead, they decided to bless others, no matter their circumstances.

Jennifer TurkJennifer Turk is a mother with a compassionate heart and a close friend of Lucas’s family. She heard about Lucas and his family’s desire to help others.

Jennifer had an idea she felt would help Lucas bless others. She knew that Lucas loves Legos, so why not put Legos into the hands of orphaned children in Lucas’ honor? Many children around the world have never before held or even played with Legos!

Jennifer contacted me, and together we developed a program known as Lucas Legos for Kids. The plan is to have church and school groups collect Legos, and with help from you and ICC, send them to the children of International Children’s Care.

Lucas and his family were excited when they heard this plan. Lucas Legos for Kids started during the 2018 Christmas season in two locations. In only one and a half months, they collected over 30 pounds of Legos!

Jennifer and other contributors then shipped their collected Legos to International Children’s Care in Vancouver, WA.

A girl and boy from Las Palmas play with their donated Legos.In January of 2019, the first Lego shipment traveled with Sharon Fleck, ICC children’s services director, to the Las Palmas Children’s Village in the Dominican Republic. Now, ICC children are playing and learning with Lucas Legos. Isn’t that exciting?!

Lucas Legos for Kids is a way for all of us to participate in the cause of giving children safe and fun Christian homes in which to grow.

Will you support Lucas and International Children’s Care in this vision?

Besides helping with Legos, you can also encourage others to help support ICC’s children.

And do pray for Lucas! His treatments are helping his cancer go into remission. By God’s grace, he will be well soon!

To learn more about how to involve your church, school, or Pathfinder club, visit ICC’s webpage about Lucas Legos for Kids.

You may also watch a video on YouTube about Lucas and Lucas Legos for Kids by using the following this link: Watch The Video.

A pile of Lego Blocks

Grateful for Your Support!

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2018
Ana shares her appreciation for the” finishing touch” you helped to provide for her!

— Editor’s Note —
In the January 2014 and 2016 Que Pasa (available online in the newsletter section of ICC’s website), we shared the story and accomplishments of Ana and Silvia Herera, two sisters who came to the Los Pinos children’s village in 2001. ICC family members like you helped them complete their nurses’ training.

In the following update from Ana, she shares what is happening in her life and thanks to you for what you have done for her.


Dear ICC —

It is a pleasure for me to be able to greet you again, hoping in God that all your activities will be filled with many blessings.

My name is Ana Beatriz Herrera. Thanks to the opportunity that you gave me in the “Los Pinos” Children’s Village in Guatemala, I was able to graduate from the University of San Carlos as a professional nurse, and then finish as a technician in respiratory therapy.

Ana Herrera (who grew up at the Los Pinos Children’s Village in Guatemala) working at the Hospital San Juan de Dios in Guatemala City. Ana was stationed in the neonatal intensive care unit. Your support of Ana while she was living at Los Pinos allowed her to realize her dream of working as a medical professional.

Ana Herrera (who grew up at the Los Pinos Children’s Village in Guatemala) working at the Hospital San Juan de Dios in Guatemala City. Ana was stationed in the neonatal intensive care unit. Your support of Ana while she was living at Los Pinos allowed her to realize her dream of working as a medical professional.

After having finished my studies at the end of 2015, I began to look for work in different hospitals. Thank God, it was not difficult to find a job, because in this country with a university degree it is easier to get a job.

By the beginning of 2016 I was working at the Roosevelt Hospital, which is one of the government hospitals in Guatemala. I started working as a respiratory therapist in the adult intensive care unit, which has a capacity of 38 beds.

In March of 2016 I needed to leave the ICC City Center because I already had a stable job, and, together with my sister Silvia, we rented an apartment in zone 11 of Guatemala City, because it was close to our work.

I thank God for allowing me to live in the Los Pinos Children’s Village, and for all their teachings, because when it comes time to become independent, it is not easy.

Ana (on the right) with her sister Silvia and her brother Luis while they were living at the Los Pinos Children’s Village in Guatemala.

Ana (on the right) with her sister Silvia and her brother Luis while they were living at the Los Pinos Children’s Village in Guatemala.

That home is my family, my alma mater that saw me grow up, and it is difficult to leave to start a new life. But thank God, it was not so difficult to adapt, because we supported each other.

In May of that same year I received a call to work at the General Hospital San Juan de Dios in the neonatal intensive care unit, which I accepted.

Well, I love my job! I worked there for two years, 2016-2017. Currently I only work in one hospital (Roosevelt Hospital). My hours are very nice — 24 hours for 4 days — so that allows me to take extra shifts and also work as a teacher to adult students who are doing an intensive internship.

Due to my job performance, I have been able to receive extra training outside of my work area, which is very satisfying for me, because I know that if I am trained I can provide better care to my patients.

I feel very grateful to the children’s village, because through it I have achieved my goals and dreams. I know that God has great plans for each of the children who are still there, and He also has plans for me.

When I have the opportunity to talk with the young ladies from the Children’s Village who currently live in the ICC City Center, I encourage them to continue studying and to fight for their dreams. I know it is not easy, but not impossible either.

I continue to attend the Adventist church in zone 13 because I know it is the most valuable thing in my life, and that was something that was instilled in my heart in the Children’s Village.

I take all the principles, values and teachings with me wherever I am. When someone asks me where I come from, I tell them with joy about the ICC Children’s Village because for me it means a lot.

Thanks to that home that I had, I now have a stable job. And, best of all, I enjoy my work, helping people in their moments of pain — and even their relatives — talking with them about God.

A thousand thanks to my home Los Pinos, to ICC and to all the people who supported me when I needed it. I always remember you all with love, and I carry you deep inside my heart.

The Importance Of The “Finishing Touch”

Tuesday, September 4th, 2018

— Part Two —

Last month’s Que Pasa featured an update from Désiré, director of ICC’s Patmos Children’s Village in the D.R. Congo. Désiré has seen first-hand the amazing results that your support provides when an orphan child is able to attend university.

According to Désiré, “Education is a weapon against poverty and domination as well as dependency. Once the children have obtained advanced education, they will have necessary tools to overcome poverty and live for themselves when they become independent. The assistance provided to them will remain unforgettable in their lives, in heaven and on earth.”

Last month, we shared the story of Guillaine and how important it was for her as a young woman to be able to attend university and earn her degree in Information Technology. She has a good job now and is able to live on her own and make a positive contribution to society.

This month, we are pleased to share the story of another one of Patmos’s children who has been blessed through the support of ICC family members like you!

Alphonse Misagwe Moise
Since the time Alphonse became a part of the ICC family, he proved to be very responsible. He had a good way of providing counsel and advice to his peers and siblings.

When the children played soccer and got into quarrels, Alphonse would heal the rifts between his “brothers.”

He avoided participating in conflict and refrained from complaining of others.

Alphonse started preaching at church and in daily worship at the age of 14. He displayed his willingness to work for God and to love God’s word.

Alphonse studied business while attending secondary school at the Patmos Children’s Village. After completing his secondary education, he enrolled in Graben University where he studied Ophthalmology.

This would not have been possible if not for the generous ICC family members like you whose ongoing support made it possible for him to go to university.

Alphonse’s academic reports were always positive showing that he excelled not only in his studies but also in his behavior.

Alphonse took advantage of the wonderful opportunity that you gave to him!

In just his second year at Graben University, Alphonse was voted as spokesman of students. He was responsible to see that the students conducted themselves appropriately and ensured there was harmony between tutors and students. He made sure that students were respectful of their teachers and kept the university regulations.

All that practice of helping to maintain harmony at Patmos was paying off! What a blessing he was at the university — just like he had been at the children’s village.

Alphonse finished his studies at the university and was awarded his degree in Ophthalmology. He then traveled to Uganda for 16 months of training. This included both the theory and practice in Optometry.

When Alphonse finished his training, he was qualified to diagnose various types of eye diseases. He was also able to make glasses.

His skills are quite rare in the Eastern part of Congo, and he was hired immediately at Goma General Hospital.

He is well paid and lives with two other boys from the Patmos Children’s Village who had earned degrees in pharmaceutical sciences. Alphonse and his roommates are grateful for the support you have helped to provide for them through the years.

They have not forgotten their home at Patmos Village and visit their brothers and sisters there bringing them presents. According to these boys, Idjwi Island is a more comfortable place than Goma where they currently live.

They are asked to speak at the church on Sabbath and do not hesitate to thank God and their sponsors for the kindness shown to them. Together with their siblings, they kneel and have prayer for the sponsors.

Alphonse and Guillaine are but two examples of the children whose lives have been positively impacted through the “finishing touch.”

It means so much to them to be educated, to be skilled, and to use their training and experience to bless others and to live independently.

Thank you for making the dreams of these children a living realty. They are grateful and are positive role models to their younger siblings.

P.S. Désiré mentioned in his report that this is a particularly difficult year. Many of the children at Patmos joined the ICC family when they were near the same age. These kids are reaching university age all around the same time.

The budget to provide the “finishing touch” has doubled this year. Désiré knows how important it is for the children to receive an education that prepares them for their future.

Won’t you please consider helping one of these children through an ongoing sponsorship or one-time gift? They will appreciate that you’re supporting them with “the finishing touch.” Use this link or call the ICC office at 800.422.7729 for more details on how you can help. Thank you!