Posts Tagged ‘Dairy’

Las Palmas Industries

Tuesday, February 12th, 2019
Investing Your Gifts To Extend Your Support

Our ICC family of projects is working diligently to develop and expand project industries. Such initiatives not only help to provide food for the children, they also generate funds to help with operating costs.

This enables the impact of your support to stretch further! At the Las Palmas Children’s Village in the Dominican Republic several industries are making a positive impact on the operation of the children’s village.

Harvesting the Sun’s Energy

Through the generous support of the VersaCare Foundation, Las Palmas has been able to establish a solar energy system that supplies a steady supply of power to the campus.

A grant from VersaCare provided the funds to install a solar-based electrical system at Las Palmas. This solar array keeps the campus supplied with electrical power day and night.

A grant from the VersaCare foundation provided the funds to install a solar-based electrical system at Las Palmas. This solar array keeps the campus supplied with electrical power day and night.

The supply of electrical power has always been a challenge at Las Palmas and there were frequent outages.

Now that Las Palmas is able to harvest energy from the sun, the children have electrical power in their homes 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

These batteries help keep the Las Palmas campus furnished with electrical power day and night.

These batteries help keep the Las Palmas campus furnished with electrical power day and night.

This is a huge benefit for the Las Palmas families! In addition, solar energy has enabled Las Palmas to have street lights for the first time! This improves the safety of the children very much.

Electricity costs have been cut by more than 50% and as the solar energy system is further enhanced, it’s possible that reliance on outside electric power can be eliminated.

Bounties from the Earth

The Las Palmas Farm has a long history of producing bountiful crops of yucca, plantain, papaya, and pineapples as well as other crops.

One of two greenhouses at Las Palmas used to grow vegetables for the families.

One of two greenhouses at Las Palmas used to grow vegetables for the families. Produce not used on-campus is sold locally. The proceeds help with the costs of operating the children’s village.

In addition to the field crops, Las Palmas operates two different greenhouses that produce vegetables for the children’s homes. The greenhouses allow for a controlled environment of more delicate vegetables and increase yield. Excess is sold locally and produces income to help with the daily operations.

Recently, Las Palmas was able to purchase a quality Massy Ferguson tractor. This reliable farm vehicle is proving to be a huge asset and blessing to the agriculture program.

Recently, Las Palmas was able to purchase a quality Massy Ferguson tractor. This reliable farm vehicle is proving to be a huge asset and blessing to the agriculture program.

The ‘new’ Massey-Fergeson farm tractor acquired by Las Palmas

Reaping a Blessing from God’s Creatures

Recently, we shared with Que Pasa readers about “Milky’s Challenge,” which is aimed at growing the Las Palmas Dairy.

Thanks to the support of many within the ICC family, the herd continues to grow as donations arrive and are sent on to the project.

A member of the Las Palmas dairy herd. Milk and cheese provided by the herd is used by the families and the surplus is sold at market. Proceeds help to offset operating costs at the children’s village.

A member of the Las Palmas dairy herd. Milk and cheese provided by the herd is used by the families and the surplus is sold at market. Proceeds help to offset operating costs at the children’s village.

The goal is to expand the herd from the current 70 to 100 head. There are also plans to begin automating the milking process. This industry has such great potential to produce significant profits for the benefit of taking care of the Las Palmas children.

In addition to the dairy, Las Palmas has also been developing a fish industry. While the children are served a vegetarian diet, there is a high market demand for fish, specifically Tilapia.

This image shows one of the six lagoons now on the Las Palmas campus used to raise fish that will be sold to market. The income from this fish industry helps to offset the monthly expenses of caring for the children

This images shows one of the six lagoons now on the Las Palmas campus used to raise fish that will be sold to market. The income from this fish industry helps to offset the monthly expenses of caring for the children

The fish industry is basically three-in-one. The first and most obvious industry is raising and selling fish. Las Palmas currently has six lagoons where fish are raised prior to being sold.

Each lagoon is about 100 meters by 50 meters. When this industry is running smoothly, a fish can grow to maturity (about 1 pound) in about 6–9 months.

Las Palmas recently hired two experts to assist in maximizing profitability. These men have been working to improve the quality of the water environment, managing the density and sizes of fish, ensuring that the diet of the fish is appropriate, and finding ways to decrease the threat of predators and thieves.

Using the best practices for this industry will help ensure a higher return on the investments being made in this industry. Las Palmas has more land available for expansion and developing more lagoons for fish.

Hiring these experts has led to two additional fish-related industries: making fish food and selling small fish called “fingerlings.”

Fish food can be challenging to find and purchase in the Dominican Republic. Currently it is being imported from places like Panama. There is a high demand for this product.

Las Palmas is now developing its own fish food business for producing pellets to feed the Las Palmas fish, and to sell to other fish farms.

This fish-food business requires special equipment and will initially be quite small. It can be operated by one person in limited space.

Eventually, this fish-food industry can be expanded further, including being housed in its own building.

The fish hatchery on the Las Palmas campus which is used to raise fingerlings. The fingerlings will either restock the on-campus lagoons or sold to other local fish farms.

The fish hatchery on the Las Palmas campus which is used to raise fingerlings. The fingerlings will either restock the on-campus lagoons or be sold to other local fish farms.

In order to have a profitable fish industry you need to have fingerlings to start each batch of fish. The supply of fingerlings in the Dominican Republic is limited, making them difficult to find as well.

So, for our own purposes we started a fingerling industry for our own needs and for selling to other fish farms.

This involves breeding fish to collect the eggs and then nurturing them until they hatch and are ready to sell or transfer to our own Las Palmas lagoons.

Diversifying the fish industry into these other two subindustries should help to increase not only efficiency but also profitability.

This in turn will help to sustain the Las Palmas Children’s Village, which then stretches the impact of your support further. What a blessing this is!

Kids Get Motivated For Missions With ICC!

Tuesday, October 30th, 2018

By Makala James

Classrooms across the United States are getting motivated for mission work with International Children’s Care.

A new program called Missions For Kids is designed to teach kids about helping others. It shows them how to live as a missionary, right at home. Lesson plans and consultations, make it easy for teachers to integrate ICC mission projects into their classroom.

This year, classrooms are fundraising to purchase cows for the dairy herd at the Las Palmas Children’s Village. As the school semester unfolds, it’s evident that the participating students care deeply about helping the kids of ICC.

In the Dominican Republic, a cow is usually purchased pregnant or has a calf. Initial cost for an adult cow is about $1,500. So, the net cost of one cow and the goal for each classroom is $750.

The music students of Great Lakes Adventist Academy in Michigan, plan to bring “Milky the Moosical Cow” on tour this spring. Each classroom participating in Missions For Kids will get a five-foot, cardboard-cutout cow after raising their first $100.

This enterprising student from Great Lakes Adventist Academy purchased a cow costume to promote Great Lake’s “Milky The Moosical Cow” fundraising effort during Alumni Weekend. Milky (on the right) is touring with the music students this year.

This enterprising student from Great Lakes Adventist Academy purchased a cow costume to promote Great Lake’s “Milky The Moosical Cow” fundraising effort during Alumni Weekend. Milky (on the right) is touring with the music students this year.

Led by music director David Ballesteros, the students plan to take their cardboard cow on tour as they raise awareness and funds.

The Great Lakes “Moosical Cow” recently came to life at the school’s alumni weekend. One of the students bought a cow costume to promote the cause at events. She did this as a surprise for her classmates and teacher. She wore the costume at alumni weekend, telling visitors about Las Palmas and the dairy herd.

“The kids are excited,” says Ballesteros. “They made their own fundraising thermometer on the wall. They carry milk jugs around at our games. They are taking ownership.”

Missions for Kids launched at the 2018 NAD Teacher’s Convention in Chicago. The convention took place in August, right before the start of the school year. Many teachers expressed an interest in introducing missions into the classroom. Other teachers already had a developed missions program. They just needed a cause to support.

Students from Mobile Junior Academy in Alabama are excited to have Milky The Cow as part of their classroom. These students, under the guidance of their teacher, Jennifer Gennick, are raising funds to help add another cow to the Las Palmas herd.

Students from Mobile Junior Academy in Alabama are excited to have Milky The Cow as part of their classroom. These students, under the guidance of their teacher, Jennifer Gennick, are raising funds to help add another cow to the Las Palmas herd.

For Beacon Christian School, in Idaho, missions is an integral part of the classroom. Students vote on what cause to support each year. They had already raised $750 before school even started… The net cost of one cow!

Terry McGarvey, elementary teacher, felt that the coincidence was providential. She introduced ICC to her classroom and the students voted to purchase a cow for the Las Palmas dairy herd.

“I believe God intervened to help us find you and enable us to help a child who really needs assistance,” McGarvey said. “Thank you for the work you do to help those in need.”

When Rene and Thomas Coffee, long time ICC supporters and family, discovered Missions for Kids, they wanted to involve the youth Sabbath school that they lead in Gobles, Michigan.

Missions for Kids can be used in Sabbath school classrooms, Pathfinder clubs, team sports, and more. It’s not limited to traditional school classrooms.

Although the Coffees are not teachers at a school, they believe in the importance of showing kids how to be missionaries. As a result, the Gobles Youth Room Sabbath School is one of the first classrooms to accomplish their goal. There will be one more cow in the dairy herd, thanks to those students and the Coffees.

At Spokane Valley Adventist Academy, elementary students are going the “extra mile” with their mission project.

While fundraising for a cow with their classroom, they are also challenging local business to fund raise for a cow.

Teacher, Julia Dewey, wants to encourage her kids to speak about important causes. “I want my students not to be so afraid to talk about something that they have a passion for,” says Dewey.

“The mission of ICC is important to me because it shows the kids how to make a long-term difference. My desire is for them to take that throughout their lives.”

This is only the start of Missions for Kids. The program has a twofold purpose: teaching children to live mission-minded lives, as well as a blessing and supporting the children of ICC.

To be a part of Missions for Kids, sign up today! Any group of any age can join! Or, please pass this information on to your school and/or Sabbath School leaders.

To sign up or for more information, contact Makala James, Missions for Kids Coordinator, at makala@forhiskids.org, or visit this link on our website: https://bit.ly/2S2vjdZ to get started.

Help Moo-ve the Las Palmas Dairy Forward!

Tuesday, August 28th, 2018

In recent editions of the Qué Pasa you’ve read about special initiatives to help the children’s projects become more self-sustaining. The jalapeno project in Mexico and the greenhouse project in El Salvador are two examples.

Aiding the projects to help themselves, stretches your support which helps more children.

In August, at the 2018 ASI convention, another of ICC’s industries received special attention.

It’s an expansion of the dairy herd at the Las Palmas Children’s Village. The dairy is blessing the children, but more “cows for the kids” are needed and you can help. Here are the details on what we’re calling “Milky’s Challenge.”

The goal of “Milky’s Challenge” is to increase the size of the dairy herd at the Las Palmas Children’s Village. The sale of milk from the herd helps to offset child-care expenses at Las Palmas helping your donation go further. Please join ”Milky’s Challenge!”

The goal of “Milky’s Challenge” is to increase the size of the dairy herd at the Las Palmas Children’s Village. The sale of milk from the herd helps to offset child-care expenses at Las Palmas helping your donation go further. Click on this picture join ”Milky’s Challenge!”

Demand is high for milk in the region around Las Palmas. Each day (excepting Sabbath), trucks pick up milk produced at the Las Palmas dairy.

Currently, there are 13 cows producing at the Las Palmas dairy. The goal is to increase that number to 80.

A cow is usually purchased pregnant or with a calf. The initial cost for an adult cow is about $1,500. If the calf is a heifer, it can be added to the herd. If it is a bull, it can be sold for around $750.

So, the net cost of one cow is about $750. That’s a bargain when you consider that in 9 months of production the initial investment has been returned through the sale of milk.

Did you know a single quality milk cow can produce enough milk for sale each month to cover the monthly expense of feeding one of “His Kids?”

Headshot of Milky the CowWon’t you consider participating in “Milky’s Challenge” to grow the herd?! Share this project with your Sabbath School class, your school, or a group of friends or family. If everyone gives a little — it will help a lot!

And now, it’s even easier to contribute. Along with the traditional ways of giving (website, phone call to 800.422.7729), you can also use your mobile phone right now to give a gift.

In your message app type the phone number 41444. In the message line type the word — Milky. You’ll receive a return message. Click the link and you’ll be taken to a secure donation page. It’s that easy!

There’s more information online at forhiskids.org/milky. We’ll be sharing the progress of “Milky’s Challenge” in the weeks ahead. Thanks for your support!

God’s Providential Leading in Nicaragua

Thursday, December 16th, 2010

In the early days of ICC’s work in Nicaragua with orphan children we worked hard to find land for a children’s village. We evaluated several properties in the country and finally decided on one that seemed to be the best.

The sale was going through just fine, and we received some funding to purchase the land. We felt that God was leading, and excitement started to build at the prospects of being able to provide permanent homes for ICC children in Nicaragua.

Then, all of sudden, the process hit a snag. The sellers decided they no longer wanted to give up their land. It was difficult for the ICC family in Nicaragua to comprehend this. We sensed that God had lead to this particular piece of property. We all wondered why things were taking a different turn.

Felix Almendarez, ICC Nicaragua’s director, continued the search until another piece of land was found. Everything about it seemed to suggest that God certainly was in control. We felt that He had blessed by stopping the process of purchasing the initial property.

A photograph of ICC's land in Nicaragua

The land where our ICC Nicaragua children's village is located.

Once ICC purchased the land, work began on preparing the site for a children’s village. Felix constructed roads, the children helped plant gardens, and most recently we completed four children’s homes. In December of 2009, the children moved into their new homes with great rejoicing.

It wasn’t too long ago that God revealed once more why the present location is wonderfully situated for a children’s village. Flooding devastated much of the surrounding area when heavy rains associated with tropical storm Matthew passed through Nicaragua.

However, the property where the children’s village is located drains well and varies in elevation. The crops remained unharmed and the dairy herd didn’t suffer any loss. This was a blessing for ICC in the midst of such chaos and ruin.

Felix happened to pass by the property that ICC initially tried to purchase. The flooding that occurred at that location astounded him. Water covered much of the land. The damage would have been horrific if ICC had purchased that land and built a children’s village.

We praise God for His providential leading in the location of ICC’s children’s village in Nicaragua. Though it was difficult to fully understand His ways during the long months of waiting, it is now clearly seen that He knew what was best all along.

Thanks for reading!

Kent Greve
International Development Director ICC