Posts Tagged ‘cow’

Help Moo-ve the Las Palmas Dairy Forward!

Tuesday, August 28th, 2018

In recent editions of the Qué Pasa you’ve read about special initiatives to help the children’s projects become more self-sustaining. The jalapeno project in Mexico and the greenhouse project in El Salvador are two examples.

Aiding the projects to help themselves, stretches your support which helps more children.

In August, at the 2018 ASI convention, another of ICC’s industries received special attention.

It’s an expansion of the dairy herd at the Las Palmas Children’s Village. The dairy is blessing the children, but more “cows for the kids” are needed and you can help. Here are the details on what we’re calling “Milky’s Challenge.”

The goal of “Milky’s Challenge” is to increase the size of the dairy herd at the Las Palmas Children’s Village. The sale of milk from the herd helps to offset child-care expenses at Las Palmas helping your donation go further. Please join ”Milky’s Challenge!”

The goal of “Milky’s Challenge” is to increase the size of the dairy herd at the Las Palmas Children’s Village. The sale of milk from the herd helps to offset child-care expenses at Las Palmas helping your donation go further. Click on this picture join ”Milky’s Challenge!”

Demand is high for milk in the region around Las Palmas. Each day (excepting Sabbath), trucks pick up milk produced at the Las Palmas dairy.

Currently, there are 13 cows producing at the Las Palmas dairy. The goal is to increase that number to 80.

A cow is usually purchased pregnant or with a calf. The initial cost for an adult cow is about $1,500. If the calf is a heifer, it can be added to the herd. If it is a bull, it can be sold for around $750.

So, the net cost of one cow is about $750. That’s a bargain when you consider that in 9 months of production the initial investment has been returned through the sale of milk.

Did you know a single quality milk cow can produce enough milk for sale each month to cover the monthly expense of feeding one of “His Kids?”

Headshot of Milky the CowWon’t you consider participating in “Milky’s Challenge” to grow the herd?! Share this project with your Sabbath School class, your school, or a group of friends or family. If everyone gives a little — it will help a lot!

And now, it’s even easier to contribute. Along with the traditional ways of giving (website, phone call to 800.422.7729), you can also use your mobile phone right now to give a gift.

In your message app type the phone number 41444. In the message line type the word — Milky. You’ll receive a return message. Click the link and you’ll be taken to a secure donation page. It’s that easy!

There’s more information online at forhiskids.org/milky. We’ll be sharing the progress of “Milky’s Challenge” in the weeks ahead. Thanks for your support!

New Residents at ICC Nicaragua Farm

Wednesday, October 13th, 2010

Thanks to recent donations, the Fountain of Life ICC Children’s Village in Nicaragua has been able to increase the size of its dairy herd. Currently there are nine cows giving milk and ten heifers that will be giving birth in about eighteen months. The milk cows have given birth to six calves. That makes a total of twenty-five cows with the potential of ten others on the way.

One of the new new cows at the ICC Nicaragua farm

One of the new cows at the ICC Nicaragua farm.

The September 2010 edition of ICC’s Que Pasa Newsletter features a personal message from Rick Fleck that tells of the blessing this dairy is to our children and the local community. A copy of that Que Pasa can be found here.

In addition to the dairy herd, the Fountain of Life Children’s Village is also raising chickens. In total there are seventy-seven chickens. These include sixty-one hens, four roosters, and twelve chicks. Eggs from the chickens provide food for our children and any excess can be sold.

Chickens from the ICC Nicaragua farm

Some of the new chickens at the ICC Nicaragua Farm.

What a blessing it is to have a growing number of animals on this campus. As well as providing milk and eggs for the children and community, they provide a small source of revenue and allow some of the children to learn animal husbandry.

Thanks for reading!

Kent Greve
Int’l Development Director ICC