Archive for the ‘Dominican Republic – Las Palmas’ Category

Your “Container of Love” Is On Its Way!

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2019
by Doug Congleton

During March 4th and 5th, our ICC staff and two volunteers joined together and loaded a 40-foot container. This container is now on the ocean destined for the Las Palmas Children’s Village in the Dominican Republic.

The container is set to arrive in the Dominican during this week. Hopefully, on April 27th. I just wish that all of you could be there when it arrives and the children and families get to open it and unload the many things that you sent to help them.

The children are so grateful to all of you who helped make this possible for them to have these much-needed items that were loaded with care.
None of this would have happened if it were not for each one of you.

On behalf of the children, thank you for giving of yourselves and the blessings that God gave to you in order for the children to share in these vital supplies.

Should Lucas Quit Or Beat Leukemia?

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2019

by William Hurtado

Lucas with one of his Lego creationsLucas Nelson, at 13 years of age, was diagnosed on August 25, 2018 with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

He was supposed to be playing freely as a child; but now he had fevers, easy bruising, abnormal weight loss, and cancerous blood cells growing inside his body. Would he survive chemotherapy and find a way to break past the exhaustion?

Lucas lives with his family in North Dakota. His parents are Seventh-day Adventist conference workers within the education and youth ministries.

Through this calamity, the family could have easily become angry with God and distanced themselves, but instead, they decided to bless others, no matter their circumstances.

Jennifer TurkJennifer Turk is a mother with a compassionate heart and a close friend of Lucas’s family. She heard about Lucas and his family’s desire to help others.

Jennifer had an idea she felt would help Lucas bless others. She knew that Lucas loves Legos, so why not put Legos into the hands of orphaned children in Lucas’ honor? Many children around the world have never before held or even played with Legos!

Jennifer contacted me, and together we developed a program known as Lucas Legos for Kids. The plan is to have church and school groups collect Legos, and with help from you and ICC, send them to the children of International Children’s Care.

Lucas and his family were excited when they heard this plan. Lucas Legos for Kids started during the 2018 Christmas season in two locations. In only one and a half months, they collected over 30 pounds of Legos!

Jennifer and other contributors then shipped their collected Legos to International Children’s Care in Vancouver, WA.

A girl and boy from Las Palmas play with their donated Legos.In January of 2019, the first Lego shipment traveled with Sharon Fleck, ICC children’s services director, to the Las Palmas Children’s Village in the Dominican Republic. Now, ICC children are playing and learning with Lucas Legos. Isn’t that exciting?!

Lucas Legos for Kids is a way for all of us to participate in the cause of giving children safe and fun Christian homes in which to grow.

Will you support Lucas and International Children’s Care in this vision?

Besides helping with Legos, you can also encourage others to help support ICC’s children.

And do pray for Lucas! His treatments are helping his cancer go into remission. By God’s grace, he will be well soon!

To learn more about how to involve your church, school, or Pathfinder club, visit ICC’s webpage about Lucas Legos for Kids.

You may also watch a video on YouTube about Lucas and Lucas Legos for Kids by using the following this link: Watch The Video.

A pile of Lego Blocks

Big Green Needs To Get Hitched. Can You Dig It?

Tuesday, March 19th, 2019

Because of you, there’s a ‘new’ tractor in town! The El Oasis Children’s Village in Mexico recently acquired a used John Deere 6615 tractor for their farm.

Purchased from a farmer with the help of three generous donors, this tractor will allow the El Oasis farm to become much more efficient as it will no longer be necessary to rent a tractor when preparing and maintaining the fields and crops.

This tractor does however have an immediate need for implements to be truly effective. The implements required for this coming season are;

  • A Fumigator
  • A Disc
  • A Plow
  • And a Harrow,

that will fit a John Deere 6615. As of right now, any implement we require must be rented. And those implements are only available when they’re not in use by other farmers.

This puts the El Oasis farm at a disadvantage when dealing with either crop-munching insects, time-sensitive and/or weather-related issues. Creating the real risk of losing crops. And losing funds that support the children.

The farm at El Oasis helps generate income that offsets the expenses of operating the children’s village. Giving your investment in “His Kids” a greater effectiveness because of funds generated by campus industries.

Please, your help is needed now.

Contact Doug Congleton at 800.422.7729 today!

Backhoe Needed For Las Palmas Industries

The Las Palmas campus, and the on-campus industries, require drainage, canals, lagoons, and ditches be dug to benefit the campus and its industries.

Right now, those projects are done with shovels and manual labor or a rented backhoe.

Even a small backhoe purchased for Las Palmas would make these much-needed excavation projects much more efficient as well as less costly in the long run.

Please Contact Doug Congleton for details at — 800.422.7729.

A Personal Message

Tuesday, March 5th, 2019

From Doug Congleton

It was like an electric charge that went from my fingers into my very soul. It was so simple, yet it was one of the most amazing things that has happened to me since joining God’s service for His kids at ICC. Let me tell you how it happened.

I was on the campus at the Las Palmas Children’s Village in The Dominican Republic working with our new industries planning team. Things were going really well, and I was pleased with the work that had been done.

We were working on new ideas and the implementation of the things we had decided to get going previously. As always, we stopped during the Sabbath hours to take time to rest and contemplate the good things God is doing in the children’s lives.

Sabbath morning I went to the on-campus church. At the end of the service I went outside and started walking down the road back to where I was staying on the campus.

As I walked I heard footsteps running up behind me, and then I felt little fingers reach out and take hold of my hand without ever saying a word.

That may sound simple to you, but in that moment, those little fingers touching mine sent what felt like an electrical current into my very being.

This little girl who I had never even been introduced to, ran up and just wanted to share her heart with me in taking my hand and walking with me those few hundred yards.

So, we walked together hand-in-hand down that little roadway until she let go in order to run off to her home to have lunch with her family.

After running a short distance, she stopped, turned back and smiled a huge smile at me as if to say, “Thank you for loving me. It feels so good!” I know my heart felt the same way!

In those brief moments I thought of our many family members of donors at ICC who give so unselfishly and faithfully. God’s people who care enough to make a commitment to providing for these little children each day.

In a very real sense, these are the people that little hand was reaching out to. That electrical charge is something that was meant for each one of you to feel for yourselves.

It’s a moment where time stands still, and you know that what you are doing is the very thing that Jesus wants from you. I totally understand now what was on the heart of Jesus when He told us in His word to “Take care of the widows and orphans.” James 1:27.

It is a responsibility that He left to each one of us to take care of these children until He comes again. It is something that I will always remember for the rest of my life.

These special children need you so much. It is only possible with your help for ICC to take loving care of these children. This is the moment when I believe that Jesus is looking to see who will stand for what is right for His children.

He is wanting to see who it is that will take the hands of these precious children and lead them to His kingdom.

Las Palmas Industries

Tuesday, February 12th, 2019
Investing Your Gifts To Extend Your Support

Our ICC family of projects is working diligently to develop and expand project industries. Such initiatives not only help to provide food for the children, they also generate funds to help with operating costs.

This enables the impact of your support to stretch further! At the Las Palmas Children’s Village in the Dominican Republic several industries are making a positive impact on the operation of the children’s village.

Harvesting the Sun’s Energy

Through the generous support of the VersaCare Foundation, Las Palmas has been able to establish a solar energy system that supplies a steady supply of power to the campus.

A grant from VersaCare provided the funds to install a solar-based electrical system at Las Palmas. This solar array keeps the campus supplied with electrical power day and night.

A grant from the VersaCare foundation provided the funds to install a solar-based electrical system at Las Palmas. This solar array keeps the campus supplied with electrical power day and night.

The supply of electrical power has always been a challenge at Las Palmas and there were frequent outages.

Now that Las Palmas is able to harvest energy from the sun, the children have electrical power in their homes 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

These batteries help keep the Las Palmas campus furnished with electrical power day and night.

These batteries help keep the Las Palmas campus furnished with electrical power day and night.

This is a huge benefit for the Las Palmas families! In addition, solar energy has enabled Las Palmas to have street lights for the first time! This improves the safety of the children very much.

Electricity costs have been cut by more than 50% and as the solar energy system is further enhanced, it’s possible that reliance on outside electric power can be eliminated.

Bounties from the Earth

The Las Palmas Farm has a long history of producing bountiful crops of yucca, plantain, papaya, and pineapples as well as other crops.

One of two greenhouses at Las Palmas used to grow vegetables for the families.

One of two greenhouses at Las Palmas used to grow vegetables for the families. Produce not used on-campus is sold locally. The proceeds help with the costs of operating the children’s village.

In addition to the field crops, Las Palmas operates two different greenhouses that produce vegetables for the children’s homes. The greenhouses allow for a controlled environment of more delicate vegetables and increase yield. Excess is sold locally and produces income to help with the daily operations.

Recently, Las Palmas was able to purchase a quality Massy Ferguson tractor. This reliable farm vehicle is proving to be a huge asset and blessing to the agriculture program.

Recently, Las Palmas was able to purchase a quality Massy Ferguson tractor. This reliable farm vehicle is proving to be a huge asset and blessing to the agriculture program.

The ‘new’ Massey-Fergeson farm tractor acquired by Las Palmas

Reaping a Blessing from God’s Creatures

Recently, we shared with Que Pasa readers about “Milky’s Challenge,” which is aimed at growing the Las Palmas Dairy.

Thanks to the support of many within the ICC family, the herd continues to grow as donations arrive and are sent on to the project.

A member of the Las Palmas dairy herd. Milk and cheese provided by the herd is used by the families and the surplus is sold at market. Proceeds help to offset operating costs at the children’s village.

A member of the Las Palmas dairy herd. Milk and cheese provided by the herd is used by the families and the surplus is sold at market. Proceeds help to offset operating costs at the children’s village.

The goal is to expand the herd from the current 70 to 100 head. There are also plans to begin automating the milking process. This industry has such great potential to produce significant profits for the benefit of taking care of the Las Palmas children.

In addition to the dairy, Las Palmas has also been developing a fish industry. While the children are served a vegetarian diet, there is a high market demand for fish, specifically Tilapia.

This image shows one of the six lagoons now on the Las Palmas campus used to raise fish that will be sold to market. The income from this fish industry helps to offset the monthly expenses of caring for the children

This images shows one of the six lagoons now on the Las Palmas campus used to raise fish that will be sold to market. The income from this fish industry helps to offset the monthly expenses of caring for the children

The fish industry is basically three-in-one. The first and most obvious industry is raising and selling fish. Las Palmas currently has six lagoons where fish are raised prior to being sold.

Each lagoon is about 100 meters by 50 meters. When this industry is running smoothly, a fish can grow to maturity (about 1 pound) in about 6–9 months.

Las Palmas recently hired two experts to assist in maximizing profitability. These men have been working to improve the quality of the water environment, managing the density and sizes of fish, ensuring that the diet of the fish is appropriate, and finding ways to decrease the threat of predators and thieves.

Using the best practices for this industry will help ensure a higher return on the investments being made in this industry. Las Palmas has more land available for expansion and developing more lagoons for fish.

Hiring these experts has led to two additional fish-related industries: making fish food and selling small fish called “fingerlings.”

Fish food can be challenging to find and purchase in the Dominican Republic. Currently it is being imported from places like Panama. There is a high demand for this product.

Las Palmas is now developing its own fish food business for producing pellets to feed the Las Palmas fish, and to sell to other fish farms.

This fish-food business requires special equipment and will initially be quite small. It can be operated by one person in limited space.

Eventually, this fish-food industry can be expanded further, including being housed in its own building.

The fish hatchery on the Las Palmas campus which is used to raise fingerlings. The fingerlings will either restock the on-campus lagoons or sold to other local fish farms.

The fish hatchery on the Las Palmas campus which is used to raise fingerlings. The fingerlings will either restock the on-campus lagoons or be sold to other local fish farms.

In order to have a profitable fish industry you need to have fingerlings to start each batch of fish. The supply of fingerlings in the Dominican Republic is limited, making them difficult to find as well.

So, for our own purposes we started a fingerling industry for our own needs and for selling to other fish farms.

This involves breeding fish to collect the eggs and then nurturing them until they hatch and are ready to sell or transfer to our own Las Palmas lagoons.

Diversifying the fish industry into these other two subindustries should help to increase not only efficiency but also profitability.

This in turn will help to sustain the Las Palmas Children’s Village, which then stretches the impact of your support further. What a blessing this is!

Caring For The King

Tuesday, January 1st, 2019
In the person of “The least of these”

“Then shall the King say unto them… I was Hungry…
Thirsty… a Stranger… Naked… Sick… in Prison and…”

By Kent Greve

Three-year-old Elisa needs help!

When Elisa was brought to the Las Palmas children’s village in the Dominican Republic, she was hungry, sick and in desperate need of a stable family to provide the loving care she needs. Here is her story:

Because of a self-destructive lifestyle, Elisa’s mother can’t provide care for her or any of Elisa’s siblings. The children have different fathers.

Sadly, Elisa’s mother is in an advanced stage of tuberculosis and may not survive.

“Sick… and you visited me”

Government officials concerned about Elisa’s situation, intervened and asked us to accept Elisa into the ICC family. Before doing so, our village director, Samilin, insisted that Elisa have a medical evaluation. Elisa tested positive for tuberculosis but does not have it nor is she contagious.

“A stranger… and you took me in”

After much careful consideration and prayer, Samilin agreed to accept Elisa if she would be given the proper treatment protocol. Samilin has taken Elisa to a pediatric immunologist. She is receiving the proper medical protocols to protect the other children.

“Hungry, thirsty, naked… and you gave me food, water, and clothing”

When Elisa arrived, she suffered from malnutrition. Immediately the Las Palmas staff went to work providing her with food and clothing as well as water to drink and for bathing. In a short while, Elisa looked and felt much better.

Though her road to recovery may be long and her future is uncertain, one thing is certain: with the loving support of generous ICC family like you, Elisa has an opportunity now to heal both physically and emotionally.

“In Prison… and you came unto me”

Unlike most prisoners, orphan children like Elisa are innocent victims held captive by circumstances far beyond their control. Yet the shackles of poverty, abuse and neglect are very real.

ICC’s mission is to come to visit these children, to release the chains that bind them and free them — giving them hope for the future. This is a special rescue mission in which the entire ICC family is privileged to take part.

Can you see that, in a unique sense, the orphan child fits every one of the descriptions of “the least of these” that Jesus spoke about in Matthew 25?

The orphan is a stranger that needs to be taken in and released from the prison of poverty, abuse and neglect.

The orphan is hungry, thirsty, naked, and wearing only the clothes he or she has. And yes, many children like Elisa are sick.

When you support an orphan child, you are demonstrating not only a special kind of love for one of Jesus’ children in need, you are demonstrating your love for Jesus Himself.

What a blessing for the children! And what a blessing for you! As we begin this new year, let’s renew our determination to answer Jesus’ call to serve Him by serving “the least of these.”

On behalf of the children within the ICC family, thank you for your generous support. Have a happy and blessed new year!

Kids Get Motivated For Missions With ICC!

Tuesday, October 30th, 2018

By Makala James

Classrooms across the United States are getting motivated for mission work with International Children’s Care.

A new program called Missions For Kids is designed to teach kids about helping others. It shows them how to live as a missionary, right at home. Lesson plans and consultations, make it easy for teachers to integrate ICC mission projects into their classroom.

This year, classrooms are fundraising to purchase cows for the dairy herd at the Las Palmas Children’s Village. As the school semester unfolds, it’s evident that the participating students care deeply about helping the kids of ICC.

In the Dominican Republic, a cow is usually purchased pregnant or has a calf. Initial cost for an adult cow is about $1,500. So, the net cost of one cow and the goal for each classroom is $750.

The music students of Great Lakes Adventist Academy in Michigan, plan to bring “Milky the Moosical Cow” on tour this spring. Each classroom participating in Missions For Kids will get a five-foot, cardboard-cutout cow after raising their first $100.

This enterprising student from Great Lakes Adventist Academy purchased a cow costume to promote Great Lake’s “Milky The Moosical Cow” fundraising effort during Alumni Weekend. Milky (on the right) is touring with the music students this year.

This enterprising student from Great Lakes Adventist Academy purchased a cow costume to promote Great Lake’s “Milky The Moosical Cow” fundraising effort during Alumni Weekend. Milky (on the right) is touring with the music students this year.

Led by music director David Ballesteros, the students plan to take their cardboard cow on tour as they raise awareness and funds.

The Great Lakes “Moosical Cow” recently came to life at the school’s alumni weekend. One of the students bought a cow costume to promote the cause at events. She did this as a surprise for her classmates and teacher. She wore the costume at alumni weekend, telling visitors about Las Palmas and the dairy herd.

“The kids are excited,” says Ballesteros. “They made their own fundraising thermometer on the wall. They carry milk jugs around at our games. They are taking ownership.”

Missions for Kids launched at the 2018 NAD Teacher’s Convention in Chicago. The convention took place in August, right before the start of the school year. Many teachers expressed an interest in introducing missions into the classroom. Other teachers already had a developed missions program. They just needed a cause to support.

Students from Mobile Junior Academy in Alabama are excited to have Milky The Cow as part of their classroom. These students, under the guidance of their teacher, Jennifer Gennick, are raising funds to help add another cow to the Las Palmas herd.

Students from Mobile Junior Academy in Alabama are excited to have Milky The Cow as part of their classroom. These students, under the guidance of their teacher, Jennifer Gennick, are raising funds to help add another cow to the Las Palmas herd.

For Beacon Christian School, in Idaho, missions is an integral part of the classroom. Students vote on what cause to support each year. They had already raised $750 before school even started… The net cost of one cow!

Terry McGarvey, elementary teacher, felt that the coincidence was providential. She introduced ICC to her classroom and the students voted to purchase a cow for the Las Palmas dairy herd.

“I believe God intervened to help us find you and enable us to help a child who really needs assistance,” McGarvey said. “Thank you for the work you do to help those in need.”

When Rene and Thomas Coffee, long time ICC supporters and family, discovered Missions for Kids, they wanted to involve the youth Sabbath school that they lead in Gobles, Michigan.

Missions for Kids can be used in Sabbath school classrooms, Pathfinder clubs, team sports, and more. It’s not limited to traditional school classrooms.

Although the Coffees are not teachers at a school, they believe in the importance of showing kids how to be missionaries. As a result, the Gobles Youth Room Sabbath School is one of the first classrooms to accomplish their goal. There will be one more cow in the dairy herd, thanks to those students and the Coffees.

At Spokane Valley Adventist Academy, elementary students are going the “extra mile” with their mission project.

While fundraising for a cow with their classroom, they are also challenging local business to fund raise for a cow.

Teacher, Julia Dewey, wants to encourage her kids to speak about important causes. “I want my students not to be so afraid to talk about something that they have a passion for,” says Dewey.

“The mission of ICC is important to me because it shows the kids how to make a long-term difference. My desire is for them to take that throughout their lives.”

This is only the start of Missions for Kids. The program has a twofold purpose: teaching children to live mission-minded lives, as well as a blessing and supporting the children of ICC.

To be a part of Missions for Kids, sign up today! Any group of any age can join! Or, please pass this information on to your school and/or Sabbath School leaders.

To sign up or for more information, contact Makala James, Missions for Kids Coordinator, at makala@forhiskids.org, or visit this link on our website: https://bit.ly/2S2vjdZ to get started.

Orphan Advocates Needed!

Tuesday, September 25th, 2018

Next month, on November 12, the international community will recognize World Orphans Day. This is a day set aside to raise awareness and support for the children who continue to be orphans — ones who have not yet made it to a safe haven like an ICC children’s village.

There are hundreds of boys and girls around the world who are blessed to belong to the ICC family. They are taking advantage of opportunities that you help to provide them through your generous support.

The impact of what you do for them can be seen when a child leaves the children’s village and finds success in his or her chosen profession. Check out the story of Ana, inside this Que Pasa. She’s a good example of what your support means to an ICC child!

The need for orphan care continues as world conditions get worse. There are wars, disease and social problems that threaten the lives of innocent children.

We often receive calls to take in children, and sadly there are not enough funds to help in all situations. But with your help, we can provide care for some of them like the two boys pictured here.

Arturo and Alonzo recently joined their new family at the Las Palmas Children's Village in the Dominican Republic

Arturo and Alonzo are cousins who recently arrived at the Las Palmas children’s village in the Dominican Republic. They were rescued from their grandmother’s home by the police.

Someone in the community filed a complaint that the boys were living in a home where the woman ran a prostitution business. The boys were not safe in this situation.

The authorities brought them to Las Palmas where they’ve become a part of the ICC family — a family that will love and provide nurturing care for them in a Seventh-day Adventist home environment. Accepting the boys is a step of faith, for Arturo and Alonzo still need sponsors.

As we approach World Orphans Day, please consider being an “Orphan Advocate.” Tell someone you know about the plight of orphans. Let them know that orphan care is so very much needed in the world today for kids like Arturo and Alonzo.

Tell them about the ICC family and how they, too, can become a part of this ministry where an orphan is orphaned no more! What a blessing it will be to Arturo and Alonzo and others like them.

If you — or someone you know — would like to sponsor one of these boys or another child in need, please contact Alanna, child sponsorship coordinator. She can be reached at 800-422-7729.

Thank you for what you do for the children!

Help Moo-ve the Las Palmas Dairy Forward!

Tuesday, August 28th, 2018

In recent editions of the Qué Pasa you’ve read about special initiatives to help the children’s projects become more self-sustaining. The jalapeno project in Mexico and the greenhouse project in El Salvador are two examples.

Aiding the projects to help themselves, stretches your support which helps more children.

In August, at the 2018 ASI convention, another of ICC’s industries received special attention.

It’s an expansion of the dairy herd at the Las Palmas Children’s Village. The dairy is blessing the children, but more “cows for the kids” are needed and you can help. Here are the details on what we’re calling “Milky’s Challenge.”

The goal of “Milky’s Challenge” is to increase the size of the dairy herd at the Las Palmas Children’s Village. The sale of milk from the herd helps to offset child-care expenses at Las Palmas helping your donation go further. Please join ”Milky’s Challenge!”

The goal of “Milky’s Challenge” is to increase the size of the dairy herd at the Las Palmas Children’s Village. The sale of milk from the herd helps to offset child-care expenses at Las Palmas helping your donation go further. Click on this picture join ”Milky’s Challenge!”

Demand is high for milk in the region around Las Palmas. Each day (excepting Sabbath), trucks pick up milk produced at the Las Palmas dairy.

Currently, there are 13 cows producing at the Las Palmas dairy. The goal is to increase that number to 80.

A cow is usually purchased pregnant or with a calf. The initial cost for an adult cow is about $1,500. If the calf is a heifer, it can be added to the herd. If it is a bull, it can be sold for around $750.

So, the net cost of one cow is about $750. That’s a bargain when you consider that in 9 months of production the initial investment has been returned through the sale of milk.

Did you know a single quality milk cow can produce enough milk for sale each month to cover the monthly expense of feeding one of “His Kids?”

Headshot of Milky the CowWon’t you consider participating in “Milky’s Challenge” to grow the herd?! Share this project with your Sabbath School class, your school, or a group of friends or family. If everyone gives a little — it will help a lot!

And now, it’s even easier to contribute. Along with the traditional ways of giving (website, phone call to 800.422.7729), you can also use your mobile phone right now to give a gift.

In your message app type the phone number 41444. In the message line type the word — Milky. You’ll receive a return message. Click the link and you’ll be taken to a secure donation page. It’s that easy!

There’s more information online at forhiskids.org/milky. We’ll be sharing the progress of “Milky’s Challenge” in the weeks ahead. Thanks for your support!

Thanks to You — Orphaned Siblings Stay Together!

Tuesday, August 7th, 2018

For many years, generous ICC family members like you have made it possible for orphan siblings to stay together. This is very important for the children. And whenever children are referred to an ICC children’s village, if there are siblings involved, attempts are made to include all the children, so they can continue growing up together.

This year, we’ve featured several sibling groups that have been rescued together and who have been able to remain together as part of the larger ICC family.

Thanks to You, Sibling Orphans Able To Stay Together!

Thanks to You these four orphaned siblings were able to stay together as part of their new family at the Las Palmas Children’s Village!

A little while ago, the four siblings in the above photos arrived at the Las Palmas children’s village in the Dominican Republic. The children’s father was no longer a part of the family, and their mother was very poor.

She had no way to work and provide care for her young children at the same time. The children were going hungry, and eventually the family was from the house in which they were staying because they couldn’t pay the rent. No other family members stepped forward to assist.

Because she had run out of options, the mother contacted the Las Palmas administer and asked her to take the children. After investigating the situation to verify the need and that Las Palmas could provide for the children, the Las Palmas administrator welcomed the children.

Again, it is because of the faithful support of ICC family members like you that makes it possible for ICC to take in, not just one of the siblings, but all of the siblings.

What a blessing for them — and what an opportunity you have now to continue your support through monthly gifts or sponsorship so that these children’s lives will be fully restored.

Thank you for making this ministry for orphans and orphan sibling groups possible!