Posts Tagged ‘Water’

Tragedy Strikes Again in the DR Congo

Tuesday, October 3rd, 2017

Newly Orphaned Children Need Immediate Help!

Overnight. In a moment. In an instant. Life can be forever altered. There are seven orphan children whose lives have been forever changed and who need your help right away! Please read on.

Several weeks ago, heavy rains fell in a province of the DR Congo. No one knew at the time that a tragedy was brewing. However, the heavy rains, combined with deforestation, were just too much for the saturated ground to hold.

Early one morning the earth trembled as a torrent of water, mud and debris gathered momentum and stormed down the hillside. Sleeping villagers had little time to react as the wall of mud crashed through their homes burying entire families and leaving behind a path of death and destruction. In just a few moments, scores of people died and over a hundred children were left orphaned.

These children (and many others) lost their families during a deadly mud slide in the DR Congo. They were brought to our Patmos Children’s Village. They need your help.

These children (and many others) lost their families during a deadly mud slide in the DR Congo. They were brought to our Patmos Children’s Village. They need your help.

As is often the case in poor countries, humanitarian aid and assistance was slow to arrive to this remote area. The survivors suffered, and this was especially true for the children.

Nearly a month went by before the government assessed what to do with the orphans. That’s when our Patmos Children’s Village was asked to help. Désiré, project director, sent an urgent appeal to my wife, Sharon, ICC’s director for children services. Here is an edited excerpt from that message:

Yesterday we received unexpected visitors — a team of five persons from North-Kivu Province. They had been sent to us by the Ministry of Social Affairs.

This team brought seven children with them. The children had severe malnutrition. They were from Mabolio where a landslide had covered 129 houses. 329 persons were unaccounted for. 97 dead bodies were found along the river. 111 surviving children were without assistance and were half-dead.

The province reported the case to the Ministry of Social Affairs. A meeting was held by the National and International Non-Governmental Organizations to study together a permanent solution to save these children.

At the end of the meeting, the children were spread to 6 children’s villages. That’s how we have received 7 children who need urgent assistance. They need quality food, medical care, clothes, accommodation, psycho-social follow-up, protection, schooling, etc.

We tried to explain to the delegation that we do not have enough financial means to take care of the children. They did not believe us because they had heard about our children we helped to become independent last year.

They also heard that Patmos village has a tremendous reputation all over the country and provides appropriate care to children.

In favor of these children, we beseech you Mother Sharon to introduce this case to the ICC Board so that the children may receive help for their salvation.

For ICC–Congo Project
Désiré MURHIMA
M.Sc Administrator

Désiré is aware of the financial implications of having seven new children to feed, clothe and educate. He has been trying to stretch the resources he has to provide for over 100 children who are currently part of the Patmos family. He has turned to us for help.

And now, I am turning to you. Will you help these children in their time of need? In considering this request, Sharon said, “How can I say no to this very urgent need? I was just feeling like we were getting down to the right number of children in the homes we have, and the Lord is sending more. Is a crowded home better than no home? Is a little bit of food better than no food? It is a life and death situation to these children.”

Today, we are dedicated to stepping out in faith to take these helpless children into our care, a faith in Jesus who has left this responsibility to all of us, and a faith in each one of you that you will step up and support these children as you always have.

It will take some time before we have enough information in order to assign these children sponsors. In the meantime, they will need the things that Désiré mentioned, which will stretch the Patmos budget even further. Your gift of support today for $50 or $100 will be life-saving for these children.

Also, the DR Congo has 423 dialects. Each tribe has its local and/or regional language. None of those at the Patmos Children’s Village knows or understands the languages of these new children. Désiré indicated most of the children don’t know their own identities.

We must move forward to help them. To rescue and restore the lives of orphan children is our mission. We are counting on you as we always have when we face an urgent situation like this. Thank you for your prayers!

On behalf of the children, thank you very much for your generosity and loving care!

May God bless you,
Rick Fleck

P.S. These seven children, orphaned by circumstances beyond their control, desperately need your help. Please send in your gift of support today!

Opportunity! Double Your EXTRA Gift Today!

Thursday, December 22nd, 2016
Special Matching Grant For Las Palmas Fish Industry!

When you support the Las Palmas fish industry with an extra donation, you’ll provide more than a double blessing! First, your donation will be matched dollar for dollar up to $30,000. Second, by helping to develop the fish farm now, you’ll make the campus more and more self-sustaining. You’ll be helping today’s kids AND the next generation of children!

“More Fish = Help for MORE CHILDREN!”

Here’s how your extra gift today will increase the Las Palmas fish industry. By expanding the fish industry to a nearby lake, you will increase the number of fish raised and increase the income to Las Palmas. And it’s all in support of the kids!

This photo shows an example of how the fish farm proposed for Las Palmas would look. Fish are raised in the individual pens. Mature fish are sold to market. A ‘batch’ of fish takes six to nine months to mature. Your donation to this Las Palmas industry will be doubled though a matching grant.

This photo shows an example of how the fish farm proposed for Las Palmas would look. Fish are raised in the individual pens. Mature fish are sold to market. A ‘batch’ of fish takes six to nine months to mature. Your donation to this industry will be doubled though a matching grant.

It’s an incredible, forward-thinking way you can have your extra gift immediately doubled, and you’ll multiply your impact even further by providing income for Las Palmas!

Thank you for supporting the ongoing needs of the children with your regular gifts and for sending an extra gift for the fish industry that will be DOUBLED!

Fuente de Vida Becomes A Fountain Of Life

Tuesday, August 16th, 2016

Nicaragua — Fuente de Vida

It was ICC supporters like you who made it possible to purchase land for the Fuente de Vida children’s village in Nicaragua. Fuente de Vida means “Fountain of Life.” We didn’t realize at the time that the property would have a literal fountain of life flowing beneath the surface. The children are very blessed to have a home on this property, and we’re certain God had his hand in this.

A severe drought has effected the region around our Fuente de Vida Children’s Village in Nicaragua. There is a deep well on the Fuente de Vida property. The project administrators are using the well to provide water to local villages.

A severe drought has effected the region around our Fuente de Vida Children’s Village in Nicaragua. We have a deep well on the Fuente de Vida property. The project administrators are using our water-tank-on-wheels to provide much-needed water to local villages.

The lack of rain has caused drought conditions in the surrounding area. Many people are suffering from a lack of water. But God has provided a wonderful well or “fountain of life” for the water needs of our children plus many neighbors in the community. During my visit it was wonderful to see how the children share their water with others. Water is drawn from the well and placed in a large holding tank on a wagon. The wagon is pulled by tractor into the surrounding area where it provides for those neighbors who are desperate for a drink of pure water.

Because we have this excellent source of water, we are also able to provide for the needs of the dairy herd which in turn helps the cows to produce adequate milk for the children. The extra is sold in the community and provides income that multiplies the power of your gifts. On Sabbath, the milk is donated to the hospital for woman and children.

What a blessing water is to this project and they are quick to pass the blessing on to others. Thank-you for helping to provide such a wonderful place for them to call home!

Heavy Rain, Floods, and Volcanoes In Nicaragua

Friday, July 22nd, 2016

Editor’s Note: We recently received information about some difficulties our project in Nicaragua is experiencing. The following is an excerpt from a message received from Felix, the project director. Please keep this project and those affected in your prayers. Thank you.

“I wanted to let you know that during the last week the Atlantic zone and the center of the country have been hit hard by intense rain so extreme that some houses have been destroyed and here in the ocean zone, the tides have been so high that they damaged part of the hotel of the Canadian friend. One day he had to transfer all the guests to Chinandega because the waves were enormous.

“The lot that we have farther up from there, in spite of being back farther from the ocean, also suffered damage, especially with the fence and the trees. This next week we will try to repair it.

“This week the church is collecting food and clothes to take or send through the emergency committee. We are helping them with the coordination. After the earthquake we had in this zone, we have had tremors almost daily, some of which are quite strong.

“The predictions aren’t comforting. A week ago they told us there is a volcano starting up in the north part of San Cristobal, but they don’t want to alarm the people. I talked with a friend who is in the Civil Defense, and he confirmed this. But they don’t want to cause fear—it might be something really serious or it might not be.

“We keep putting our trust in our Creator and doing what is within our power in order to have enough dry food stored and some canned food. We have prepared a package for each child with the basics in case of an emergency. Now when the budget of the month comes we will renew the pantries and will equip each vehicle with first aid kits. It’s better to be prepared.”

Heavy Flooding And Erosion Damage Patmos

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

Earlier this year, heavy flooding caused damage at our children’s village in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Here’s an excerpt from a message received from our project director, Désiré:

“We received a heavy rain but due to God’s mercy we survived. The river behind us overflowed and the whole block was swept off and it also encroached where the cows stay as you will see on the photos. The other small house for the calves was swept off by heavy waters.

Erosion due to heavy flooding on the campus of the Patmos Children's Village in the  DR Congo

Damage due to heavy flooding on the campus of the Patmos Children's Village in the DR Congo. The shelter for the calves was ruined due to the significant erosion.

“The gully may need to be built but we wanted you to see the pictures of how rain caused this heavy erosion around the cows’ premises. The cow’s shelter would be better to be constructed in a permanent material in order to be on a safe side. Thanks for your good collaborations, God bless you abundantly.”

Kids and adults alike join in making temporary repairs from heavy flooding at the Patmos Children’s Village in the DR Congo

Kids and adults alike join in making temporary repairs necessitated by significant erosion due to heavy flooding at the Patmos Children’s Village in the DR Congo

Our Patmos Children’s Village on Idjwi island is in need of financial assistance to aid with the recurring problem caused by erosion. In the past, funds have been sent to remedy other erosion issues, and these efforts have been highly successful. Please consider assisting with this additional need.

A Special Message From India

Wednesday, December 26th, 2012

We are passing along to all of you, as requested by the sender, this note from the director of our children’s village in India, Lilly Kaligithi.

Dear Friends;

As you celebrate this Christmas may our Lord’s birth be experienced in your hearts and bring you joy and hope for eternal bliss. Soon we will enter into another New Year, 2013. May the Lord guide and bless every step that you take and every decision you make.

God has blessed Sweet Home in many ways. My heart is filled with gratitude as I look back on what our children have accomplished by the grace of God. One boy completed Masters in Biotechnology, and received a medal for his outstanding performance. Four [children] have graduated with a B.Sc. Degree in Nursing and nine have graduated from Academy.

They certainly made me proud. I wish to take this opportunity to thank each one of you for your great support and encouragement.

“And the Lord shall guide thee continually, and satisfy thy soul in drought, and make fat thy bones; and thou shalt be like a watered garden, and like a spring of water whose waters fail not.” Isaiah 58:11

With best wishes and Season’s Greetings from your Sweet Home Family;

Lilly F. Kaligithi

Water Lighting Patmos Children’s Village

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012

Recently our administrator of the Patmos Children’s Village in the DR Congo, Désiré, reported that thanks to Mr. Jovan, an Italian engineer, and his team of five who came from Butembo, our Patmos hydroelectric project is functioning.

The hydroelectric turbine that provides electric power to our Patmos Children's Village in the D.R. Congo

The hydroelectric turbine that is providing electrical power to our homes at the Patmos Children's Village in the D.R. Congo. This hydroelectric plant is the very first to ever be built on the Island of Idjwi.

We now have electric lights in our homes at the Patmos Children’s Village on the island of Idjwi. The lights have been installed in the houses, school and church. This hydroelectric plant is the very first in the history of the Island of Idjwi.

This is the hydro canal that feeds water to the Patmos Hydroelectric Plant.

This is the hydro canal that feeds water to the Patmos Hydroelectric Plant which provides electric power to our homes at the Patmos Children's Village..

This project necessitated a great deal of hard manual labor in order to build the canal that carries the small stream of water to where it can feed a small turbine. This turbine produces 220 volts of electricity that will now provide lighting and electrical power for the church, school and homes in the children’s village.

The gauges that monitor the power output from the Patmos Hydroelectric Plant.

The gauges that monitor the power output from the Patmos Hydroelectric Plant.

Funds are needed for this project, and Désiré will be sending a project update to let us know what is still needed, so watch for more details.

Thanks for reading!

Water Emergency

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012

Water. It’s often taken for granted when you turn on the faucet anticipating a clear stream of liquid to refresh, to cleanse, to invigorate. Nothing satisfies thirst like water, and when a problem in the supply system interrupts the flow of water to our ICC children it becomes an urgent problem that requires immediate attention. This is what happened at ICC’s Los Pinos Children’s Village in Guatemala. The children’s homes and facilities draw water from two wells, and recently the children and staff were totally without the use of either of them.

The well behind the bakery has a broken pipe inside, and the workers can’t get the pump out. The problem was immediate, and our administrator had to solve it quickly. The pump motor on the other well burned out, and the shaft is broken.

For a very short time, water was shared from an emergency well at ICAP, the secondary school whose property is next to Los Pinos. However, this was only a temporary solution.

The cost of purchasing a new pump for the second well is $1,543. Our administrator, Joel Carpio, had no choice but to purchase the pump and quickly put it into service. Once again, water flowed through the system and our children and staff had the supply they needed.

Problem solved? In one sense, yes, and in some years, it may not have mattered too much if Joel had to use operating funds for this out-of-budget purchase. But this year it matters very much because the summer months have seen donation income decrease significantly at ICC. This has put a huge strain on all our projects as we’re not always able to send operating funds at the time they are needed. ICC project administrators like Joel are trying their best to keep the essential operations moving along, despite the hardships. When something like the broken wells occurs, it causes added strain to the budget. In this situation, Joel had to use money from his already depleted operational funds which are desperately needed to provide for the care of our children.

I’m writing today to make you aware of this situation. We need your prayers. We need our Heavenly Father’s blessing from the “windows of heaven” so that Joel is able to have sufficient operating funds to provide for the daily care of the children. If you feel the nudge to assist Joel please let us know. You can also send your donation marked “Guatemala Need.”

Thank-you for your continued interest and support of ICC’s children and projects around the world. It’s the ongoing, consistent support of our faithful supporters that makes this ministry for orphaned and abandoned children possible. Without you, we’d not be able to care for them. So, in a sense, it’s our supporters who put the “care” into International Children’s Care. May God richly bless you for your care and support of the children.

In His service,

Kent Greve
International Development Director

Another Shipment of Supplies for Romania

Friday, May 20th, 2011

IKN (ICC Netherlands) has sent another transport this week to Romania. Every year they send two full trucks with relief goods to the ICC Romania children’s village. This time the truck was filled with items like paint, 43 new children bicycles, adult and children’s clothing, CAT work clothing, and two big water tanks for catching rain water.

Paint for Romania

The paint recently shipped to ICC's Romanian project

Rain water collection tanks for ICC's Romanian project.

The rain water collection tanks for ICC's Romanian project.

Also included was roofing material. The ICC Romania Children’s village has a “lighthouse project” that provides assistance in the surrounding village. Around 40% of the people of this village live in extreme poverty. The roofing material will be used to put new roofs on 10 homes. This will be done this summer by a group of ADRA Netherlands volunteers.

Loading the roofing materials onto the truck hauling the shipment of supplies to ICC's project in Romania.

Loading the roofing materials onto the truck

Thanks for reading!

Lambro Triantos
Director IKN/ICC Netherlands

A Tragic Loss at ICC Cambodia

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010

We recently received a message from Glenn Roberts, director of our partner office in Australia who shared this tragic story:

“Whenever a calamity befalls a nation where ICC is represented, we wonder how those we work with and for have fared. Most of you will have heard on the news that many people died during a human stampede in Phnom Penh during the closing day of the annual water festival.

“We were informed by Greg Allen, our Program Manager for Cambodia, who was in-country at the time, that one of the ICC sponsored university students was evidently caught up in the crowd and tragically lost his life. Pol Ang (Eang) was in his 4th year of a Civil Engineering Degree at Nor Tun University. His body was found at one of the hospitals by some of his university student friends from ICC House in Phnom Penh. This is a tragic and sad time for them all.

A photo of Pol Ang

Pol Ang 1985–2010

“Pol Ang was brought to ICC Cambodia by his grandmother after his mother died and his father abandoned him at age 5. He would have turned 25 on 2 December 2010. Life is too short even when lived out to an old age, this young man with promise, lived a life that was far too short.

“The funeral for Pol Ang was held at ICC Cambodia’s Light of Hope Children’s Village. We invite you to join with the ICC family in thoughtful prayer as we mourn the passing of this young man.”

Thank you for being a very important part of the lives of ICC’s children.

Kent Greve
International Development Director ICC