Posts Tagged ‘Food’

Potato Harvest in Romania

Monday, October 21st, 2013

Potatoes are a staple food for our ICC children in Romania. Potatoes are prepared in different ways and the children love them. For a few years now, our ICC partner in the Netherlands has found a company to help supply seed potatoes for our project. These are shipped to Romania along with other needed items for our children and the wider community.

Harvesting Potatoes at International Children’s Care’s Romanian Children’s Village

Harvesting potatoes at ICC’s Romanian children’s village

This past March, 1,200 kg  (2,645 lbs.) of seed potatoes were included in the transport. These were planted in the ICC Romania garden and nurtured through the growing season. When the staff and children harvested the potatoes, the yield was 6,000 kg (over 13,000 lbs). This quantity is enough to feed the children until the next harvest.

Potatoes grown on the ICC Romania Farm

Some of the potatoes that were harvested at the ICC Romania children’s village

What a blessing this arrangement is for our children and staff. They received a donation that quite literally grew bigger as they nurtured and cared for it. This is symbolic of the children themselves. Many of them come to us as small children. Yet, with nurturing love and care, they also grow and develop and mature into talented and energetic young people with the capacity to make a difference in the world.

Thanks ICC Netherlands for organizing this initiative.

Distressing News — Renewed Fighting And Insurrection In The DR Congo

Friday, May 31st, 2013

We received a distressing email from the DR Congo on Monday, May 27, 2013. Désiré Murhima, our director of ICC Congo, informed us that rebel militias were once again attacking the city of Goma where the office for ICC Congo is located and where some of our newest children were temporarily housed. Following is an excerpt of Désiré’s email:

“We are sorry to tell you once more, in less than five months, about war in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

“In fact, after our last phone call (which failed because of network connection) [that] same night we did not sleep owing to bombs launched and gun shots in the northern part of Goma and at less than 900 m (less than half-a-mile) [from] Goma International Airport. Until now there are only two days of some peace (Saturday, May 25th & Sunday, May 26th).

“On Thursday, May 23rd, around 9:10 AM, two bombs fell [on] Goma approximately 300 m (two-tenths of a mile) [from] our ICC Congo Office. Consequently [as a result of the blast] one [local] child died, [another] lost [both] legs and another child had his right arm [severed] and his eye was totally damaged.

ICC Congo children from Goma being transported by boat to the Patmos Children’s Village on the island of Idjwi in Lake Kivu

ICC Congo children from Goma being transported by boat to the Patmos Children’s Village on the island of Idjwi in Lake Kivu

“On the basis of this horrible situation, we immediately took the decision to take the new children [to the Patmos Children’s Village] on Idjwi Island where they can live peacefully. [On] Idjwi, we accommodated them in one part of the newly built home [number] eight.

ICC Congo children from Goma on Idjwi

The ICC Congo children from Goma are now residing at the Patmos Children’s Village on the island of Idjwi

“Nowadays, Goma town is not supplied in food because all the roads from Butembo, Rutchuru, Masisi and Bukavu are blocked/shut/closed by rebel militaries. There is only access to Goma town via the Kivu Lake. Civilian aircraft (excepting military aircraft) do not land or take off. Half of Goma’s population has moved to other peaceful areas/regions/places/zones.”

We highly need your prayers.

Désiré Murhima
Administrator ICC Congo

Flooding in The Philippines

Thursday, September 13th, 2012

Some of you may have seen the news reports about the severe flooding that occurred last month in the Philippines as a result of tropical storm Haikui, Typhoon Saola and the heavier than average annual monsoons. ICC’s children’s village was impacted as two of the houses in the children’s village were affected by flood water. The bridge and front gates were also washed away.

Fortunately the children are safe. Praise the Lord. The school provided shelter for some of the indigenous families from the community.

Photo of damage from flooding in the Philippines — Photo Credit: Mathias Eick EU/ECHO – Creative Commons License

Photo Credit: Mathias Eick EU/ECHO – Creative Commons License

ICC Australia launched a fundraising effort to help resolve the issues. This includes:

  • Emergency repairs to children’s homes
  • Medicines/vitamins
  • Front access road temporary repair
  • Food, clothing, personal care items, medical supplies and kitchen items for indigenous families

To help support this initiative, please contact the ICC office at 800-ICC-Pray.

Help Urgently Needed In Congo

Monday, May 21st, 2012

We’ve been receiving disturbing news for the past several weeks from our staff at our Patmos Children’s Village in the DR Congo. It seems that once again regional civil war has resumed near our project. What you read here reflects the most recent information we have received from our staff in the DR Congo.

A number of officers from the Congolese army have recently joined with, or started their own, rebel paramilitary organizations to oppose the current government of the DR Congo after it was announced by the president of the DR Congo that one rebel commander in particular should be arrested for ‘crimes against humanity.’

The fighting between this rebel commander, his supporters and the Congolese army has reached the city of Goma approximately 40 miles from our children’s village. Over 20,000 refugees from the surrounding territories have fled into Goma or across the border into Rwanda to escape the fighting. In some cases entire villages have been deserted as the occupants flee the conflict.

Worse yet, children are once again being recruited or conscripted to fight for the rebel warlords. Young men of high school and college age are especially being targeted for conscription into the rebel armies.

Our children and young people studying in Goma and at nearby universities as well as our staff in Goma have returned to the children’s village on the island of Idjwi where it is relatively safe. Predictably this has put a significant strain on our budget and supplies at Patmos.

Prices for food and fuel have nearly doubled in a few short weeks and many stores have closed because all staples have become increasingly scarce or simply unavailable. Demand has also increased because farmers are abandoning their fields and farms to escape the fighting and the population of refugees flooding into Goma is swelling dramatically on a daily and sometimes hourly basis.

Frankly we need your immediate help and assistance to deal with this unstable situation. It is vital that we do our best to collect three months worth of supplies at the Patmos Children’s Village so we can weather this storm as we care for our children. Without  your help the future is very uncertain.

Please contact ICC at (800) 422-7729 to make a contribution or use this link — Congo Emergency Supplies Fund — to make a secure online donation at our website. When you donate online be sure to write, “Congo Emergency Supplies” in the description box.

Thanks for much for all you do for “His Kids!”

Ken Wilson
Media Director ICC

News of Renewed Militia Action in DR Congo

Friday, February 24th, 2012

Some of you may have heard reports about an outbreak of fighting in the Democratic Republic of Congo. According to ICC’s director in the DRC, Desire Murhima, “the fighting is 430 km (267 miles) from Patmos Village… Up to now our project is not affected by this fighting.”

ICC’s children are blessed to live on the Island of Idjwi which is not of any strategic significance in the wars that have ravaged this country. Desire also said that while the fighting is going on “the price of food, construction materials and other things increases.” In your prayers, please remember ICC’s children and staff in this war-torn country.

Another Transport to Romania

Friday, January 20th, 2012

On the 22nd of November another transport was loaded for Romania by the ICC office in the Netherlands. Dutch volunteers loaded a Romanian truck with building materials for the bakery. Items included natural stone, special glue for floor tiles and special lighting fixtures for the ceiling. There were three pallets with food and some clothes, toys and furniture.

A photo of the crew who loaded the truck

The crew who loaded the truck and the truck they loaded

The shipment also contained 750 shoe boxes. Each shoe box was filled with school materials and a gift. ICC Romania will give these boxes to the pupils of the elementary schools in the surroundings of the ICC Children Village. ICC Romania will also distribute 220 family boxes with food for the poorest families in their area.

Over the years ICC has developed a lighthouse program to support the needs in their community.

Lambro Triantos
Director of IKN (ICC Netherlands)

Food Is A Luxury In The DR Congo

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012

Some days it feels as though we are not all living on the same planet. Or as Paul Harvey used to say; “It is not one world.”

A story in the January 3 New York Times, “For Congo Children, Food Today Means None Tomorrow” by Adam Nossiter, caught our attention. It told how parents in the DR Congo can only afford to feed their children just one meal every other day.

This is what Joel Reyes, our public relations director, posted to his Facebook page about how ICC’s children have been effected.

“I hope some of you are able to read this article. It is a reality most of us ignore and some may even think is a myth. We had heard that our children in our ICC Congo project were only eating two meals per day because they didn’t have the budget to provide three [meals per day]. We were horrified when we heard that, however the kids were not complaining. They thought they had it good, and they did considering the rest. They are eating three meals [per day] now.”

Please take a few minutes to read this story. The events in this article are the daily life for millions of people in the DR Congo.

We would also like thank you for supporting “His Kids.” As you can see by this story your support of ICC truly does make a difference.

Here’s the link to the story–
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/03/world/africa/in-congolese-capital-power-cut-applies-to-food.html

Thanks for reading!

Ken Wilson
Media Director ICC

The Perspectives of an ICC Student Missionary: Naomi/El Salvador

Tuesday, November 15th, 2011

One of our student missionaries in El Salvador sent me this letter concerning the torrential rains that occurred in El Salvador during October 2011. I thought I’d share her experience with you.

Noami with two chidren from ICC El Salvador

Naomi (center) who is a student missionary at ICC's project in El Salvador

“Last week [October 9–20, 2011] a terrible storm hit most of El Salvador [60 inches of rain]. Many people lost their homes, valuables, clothing, shelter and food. I joined the campus Pathfinder club and some ICC El Salvador staff to give out food and clothes in a nearby village.

Photo of a flooded road in El Salvador

Typical flooding from the October 2011 rains in El Salvador

“When we got to the church at which we were to volunteer, I saw such a long line of men, women and children! Practically everyone in that town had nothing left to their names. It was such a sad experience to see little kids with shorts on even thought the night had been cold and they each had hungry looks on their faces.

Photo of people waiting for food and clothing during the relief efforts after the Oct 2011 rains in El Salvador

People waiting for food and clothing being distributed by our staff members and Pathfinders from ICC El Salvador

“As we passed out the food and the drinks, the people said, ‘Let’s give a round of applause to Seventh-day Adventist church group!’ And they started to clap for us; it was so touching to see how grateful they were with what little we could give them.

Staff members from ICC El Salvador distribute food to people who lost their homes due to flooding resulting from Oct 2011 torrential rains in El Salvador

ICC El Salvador Pathfinders and staff members serve food to people displaced by flooding from torrential rains in El Salvador during October 2011

“We left the people well-fed and with warm clothes on their backs. I was SO proud of the ICC kids that came to volunteer. By some standards, these kids don’t have much themselves, but they were still willing to share with those who had lost everything.

“As I was passing out drinks, I overheard two men from the church talking about me in Spanish. They were saying, ‘She can’t be a missionary, she is way too young.’

“After a while of listening to this, I approached them and asked why they thought I was too young to be a student missionary. I explained that although I look young, I am 19. Even if I was very young, what did that matter if God wanted to use me?

“The look on their faces was priceless! They thought I couldn’t understand/speak Spanish. So they began apologizing and said they agreed with me, if God wanted to use a young person, why couldn’t a young person be used? I assured them they hadn’t offended me.”

ICC is in the business of letting God use those He has called to serve. Please contact us today if you are interested in allowing God to use your gifts.

Thanks for reading!

Lori Manley
ICC International Social Worker

Violent Storm Damages Las Palmas Crops

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

We’ve received some disturbing news from Mario Lora, ICC’s business and farm manager at the Las Palmas Campus in the Dominican Republic. On Friday, May 27 an isolated and violent storm swept through the Las Palmas campus and caused extensive damage to the farm crops which had been growing in such abundance.

Weather forecasts had not predicted the storm, and it hit the campus unexpectedly and with terrific force. According to Mario, “Its radius of action was practically in our locality and towards the mountains. In fact, the nearby city of Bonao had no damage.

“We understand that it affected an area of about 10 square kilometers with us in the center. We haven’t heard anything about it on the news, and everyone who comes here is surprised when they see the destruction.

“In fact, one of the engineers in charge of the greenhouse project, when he came here was stunned because he didn’t know this had happened, and he was investigating a lot to see what happened. It was quick, only lasting about 20 to 25 minutes as a strong storm, and then the rain lasted for a long time afterward. There was no warning to prepare.”

Plantain trees from the Las Palmas farm destroyed by a focused storm.

Some of the destroyed plantain trees from the Las Palmas farm

About 2/3 of the plantain crop was damaged by the heavy winds and rain that accompanied the storm. Many of the trees were laden with plantains and according to Mario, “With a few exceptions, all trees that had stalks (bunches) of plantains fell to the ground. The stalks varied a lot, from ones that were just flowering to those that were ready to harvest.

Of the trees that didn’t have stalks, only a few fell to the ground, but a very small percentage. We think that about 2,500 plantain trees fell over. Each stalk has about 30 to 40 plantains, which at the current market price are worth between 5 and 7 pesos, so each stalk is worth about 150 pesos [$4.05]. When we multiply that by 2,500 trees, it comes out to a loss of about 375,000 pesos [$10,135]. Also, we were left with about 1,250 trees which will start flowering in the next three months.”

The loss of the trees means more than the loss of the crop. A tree can produce several crops, plus they produce other “children” – small trees that grow up to the next generation. Mario, the staff and children at Las Palmas have quickly started the process of rehabilitating trees that can be salvaged and planting new trees.

Mario states that, “when we plant a new crop it takes about 8 or 9 months to start producing.” One piece of good news is that the project already has enough seeds to do the replanting and together with rehabilitating the damaged trees, the project should be able to expand the crop. This will have to wait until the rains allow the workers to prepare the land.

Plantains are a staple crop at the children’s village. This loss will certainly impact the project. Mario continues. “Of the production that we had projected, we consume almost the entire crop. What was happening at this moment was that as the plantains would get ripe we would cut them for use in the homes. They were not all ready to cut at the same time. In fact, many times we have had to cut them before they were really ready because of the needs in the homes.”

One of the other important crops at Las Palmas is Yucca. Mario estimated that perhaps 30% to 40% was affected. Since Yucca are tubers, it’s difficult to say at this time what the effect of the storm may be. However, there was significant damage to the plants themselves and the tubers may rot or not develop normally.

Garden vegetables were also hit hard, and according to Mario, “everything we had was ruined.” The house father and children of house 4 on the Las Palmas campus had put forth dedicated effort to supply the homes with vegetables. Mario estimates that this was valued at the equivalent of $135 per week so over the next 8 weeks as they wait for new crops to mature, they’ll need to spend about $1,080 to replace what was lost.

Two hatchlings sleep in their nest after the storm.

Two hatchlings sleep in their nest after the storm

There are some bright spots in all this discouraging news. All the children and staff escaped unharmed. Praise God for that! Also, the sweet potato, corn and pineapple crops were not damaged. As well, there is something telling about how Mario describes the attitude of the staff and children on campus. “What has impressed me the most in all this,” he states, “is the good spirit that exists among the employees and the kids. We can see complete unity in order to reestablish, with God’s help and our efforts, what has been damaged. We have courage to continue on as long as the Lord gives us the strength.”

We’re pleased to report that when the Versacare Foundation heard about this tragedy, they immediately provided a donation of $10,000 to help with this food emergency. What a blessing this is! Additional funds are needed, and if you would like to help, please mark your donation “Las Palmas Farm and Food Fund.” It will directly assist with this need.

Thank you for your generous support.

Kent Greve
Director International Development ICC