Archive for the ‘General Information’ Category

Water Emergency

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012

Water. It’s often taken for granted when you turn on the faucet anticipating a clear stream of liquid to refresh, to cleanse, to invigorate. Nothing satisfies thirst like water, and when a problem in the supply system interrupts the flow of water to our ICC children it becomes an urgent problem that requires immediate attention. This is what happened at ICC’s Los Pinos Children’s Village in Guatemala. The children’s homes and facilities draw water from two wells, and recently the children and staff were totally without the use of either of them.

The well behind the bakery has a broken pipe inside, and the workers can’t get the pump out. The problem was immediate, and our administrator had to solve it quickly. The pump motor on the other well burned out, and the shaft is broken.

For a very short time, water was shared from an emergency well at ICAP, the secondary school whose property is next to Los Pinos. However, this was only a temporary solution.

The cost of purchasing a new pump for the second well is $1,543. Our administrator, Joel Carpio, had no choice but to purchase the pump and quickly put it into service. Once again, water flowed through the system and our children and staff had the supply they needed.

Problem solved? In one sense, yes, and in some years, it may not have mattered too much if Joel had to use operating funds for this out-of-budget purchase. But this year it matters very much because the summer months have seen donation income decrease significantly at ICC. This has put a huge strain on all our projects as we’re not always able to send operating funds at the time they are needed. ICC project administrators like Joel are trying their best to keep the essential operations moving along, despite the hardships. When something like the broken wells occurs, it causes added strain to the budget. In this situation, Joel had to use money from his already depleted operational funds which are desperately needed to provide for the care of our children.

I’m writing today to make you aware of this situation. We need your prayers. We need our Heavenly Father’s blessing from the “windows of heaven” so that Joel is able to have sufficient operating funds to provide for the daily care of the children. If you feel the nudge to assist Joel please let us know. You can also send your donation marked “Guatemala Need.”

Thank-you for your continued interest and support of ICC’s children and projects around the world. It’s the ongoing, consistent support of our faithful supporters that makes this ministry for orphaned and abandoned children possible. Without you, we’d not be able to care for them. So, in a sense, it’s our supporters who put the “care” into International Children’s Care. May God richly bless you for your care and support of the children.

In His service,

Kent Greve
International Development Director

Teddy Bears Help ICC Kids Get To Sleep

Wednesday, September 12th, 2012

We received this note from Ronny Van Dessel of ICC Belgium telling us of a rather unique donation for the children of ICC.

Recently, ICC Belgium was contacted by Mrs. Sabrina Polakoff, who wanted to donate to us 100 ‘Lulabie Teddy Bears’.

The Lulabie Bears are the first ever long-lasting, scented, sleep-well, aromatherapy teddy bears for babies and young children designed to aid in a good nights sleep.

Sabrina Polakoff and Ronny Van Dessel hold a Saffie teddy bear

Sabrina Polakoff and Ronny Van Dessel (left and right respectively) hold one of the “Saffie” bears from The Lulabie Bears collection. The teddy bears were donated by Mrs. Polakoff to ICC Belgium.

The Lulabie Bears come in four different colors. Each of the bears also has a name with an educational meaning. The beige bear is named ‘Rubie’ and stands for respect, the pink bear is named ‘Rhodie’ and stands for love & education, the blue bear is named ‘Saffie’ and stands for energy and the brown bear is named ‘Selie’ and stands for everything that has to do with nature.

We also received a very nice surprise when arrangements were made to pick up the bears in Antwerp. Because another organization wasn’t able to accept their donation of bears, ICC Belgium received not 100 bears, but 200 bears!

ICC Belgium is very happy that 200 ICC children, or possibly children who are living near our projects, can be made happy with these beautiful ‘Lulabie Teddy Bears’.

Ronny Van Dessel
ICC Belgium

ICC Loses A Treasured Friend And Colleague

Sunday, August 26th, 2012

[Sunday, August 26th, 2012]

Lambro Triantos 1968–2012

Lambro Triantos, 1968–2012. Lambro with some of the children from ICC's Patmos Children's Village.

ICC’s children and staff have suffered a painful loss as one of our highly loved and esteemed family members has passed to his rest. Lambro Triantos, director of ICC’s partner in the Netherlands as well as European Regional Director, died this morning after battling an aggressive and fast spreading cancer. Lambro was 44.

Vasili Triantos, Lambro’s brother, related that as the sun came up on Sabbath morning, Lambro’s family gathered around him and sang songs of hope—eternal hope. Lambro quietly went to sleep in Jesus.

Kent Greve, ICC’s International Development Director, shared that “I had the privilege of working alongside a true champion in our mission to provide care for orphan and abandoned children. This loss is far reaching in its scope and impact. Lambro was a talented and effective advocate for ICC children around the world. He was a devoted husband and father, and loved Jesus. We will miss Lambro and will cling to the blessed hope of seeing him again when Jesus comes.

Rick Fleck, ICC’s president, in sharing the news with ICC administrators and board members stated that “Although it is difficult and painful for us to lose a loved one, we rejoice in the faith that this death is only a temporary sleep, and Jesus will soon awaken Lambro to be gathered up with Him and with us if faithful together in the clouds of angels to be received into Jesus’ loving arms to live with Him forever. Let’s live and prepare for that day so we will all be there!”

Lambro is survived by his wife, Kalin, his two young children, his parents, Magda and Dimitri, and his brother, Vasili.

Funeral services will be held at the Open Hof Church at the Walraven van Hallstraat 2 in Zwijndrecht, Netherlands at 13:00 on Friday, August 31.

Let’s unite in prayer and thought with his family at this difficult time.

Sarahʼs Story

Friday, June 22nd, 2012

The following is a personal account from Sarah Johnston. Her story was featured by Alcyon Fleck in the July 2012 edition of ICC’s Que Pasa Newsletter.

This is my story about how the Lord has been with me through the years. I was born in 1980 in a Mayan village in Guatemala. There was a civil war going on in Guatemala at that time. I was still a baby when a battle took place in my village in which many people were killed. I was on my mother’s back when a bullet took her life and wounded my feet.

This is all I know about the family I was born into, and the people of my village. In spite of the tragedy God was looking out for me, even though I did not know Him at that time. God sent a nice man who loved children to find me and a little boy. He took us to the military hospital in Guatemala City.

At the hospital they gave me the name “Mercedes Lopez.” The little boy and I did not stay at the hospital for long because the general that found us knew of a lady that loved children and had an orphanage in Guatemala called Los Pinos. The general called Mrs. Fleck and told her to come and see the two children he found. She did come to the military hospital to see us. I was about ten months old and stood in my crib when Mrs. Fleck saw me. The boy’s name was Lazaro, and he was even years old. He had a wound on his head and his hand.

In the limousine on the way to Mrs. Fleck’s home I sat on her lap and Lazaro sat close beside her. Not knowing where I was going I began to scream in terror and clung to Mrs. Fleck’s neck so hard that she could barely breathe. Mrs. Fleck was so nice to me and the boy. She rocked and held me until I went to sleep. In the morning Mrs. Fleck took us to the “Los Pinos” [children’s village] in Guatemala.

Sarah's First Days at Los Pinos

Sarah (in the yellow dress) not long after she came to live at Los Pinos

Juana, one of the ladies that worked at “Los Pinos,” took me to a house where the house mother could handle another little one. I do not know how long I was at “Los Pinos,’ but I do know that God was still looking out for me. Little did I know that God already had a good Christian family for me. This family lived in Vermont on a farm. They had two older children and a little baby boy, but the mother was praying that God would give her a little Indian girl. So when she found a little picture with a story of me in the Adventist Review it touched her heart, and she knew I would fit in the family if it was God’s will.

But it took nine months until they got me, even though they thought I would come at Christmas. It was a good thing I did not come at Christmas because Christine, the mother, had an operation in January and it took her a long time to heal after the operation. When she tried to do so she had a terrible headache which made it impossible for her to stay up or eat sitting erect. After much prayer the Lord urged her to exercise in the snow crawling around crying out for God’s help to be fit for her children and Sarah.

Sarah Lisa was the name they chose after they were told of Mercedes. In God’s time, exactly nine months later, the three year old came and “mommy” was well enough to receive her girl. Roger, the father, had almost traveled to Guatemala to pick me up since they were told to do so by the orphanage, but as it turned out he did not need to since Mrs. Fleck had another girl to bring and brought me up with her. Christine bought a pretty pink and white dress and shoes and mailed it away to Guatemala for me. And then they waited at the Boston airport until the plane I was on arrived. They found me with the pretty dress. I looked like a doll. Christine ran and picked me up. I looked surprised and they were surprised at how small I was.

Sarah After Joining Her New Family

Sarah after she was adopted into her new family

My new family was prepared for crying and a sleepless night as we all slept in a hotel. But I slept and their one and a half year old baby boy slept also. On the long trip home we stopped to get some food, and that is when they found out that I had the biggest appetite a tiny girl could have. I ate until all of the food was gone, and Christine wondered if maybe she gave me too much. Eating was something that I knew how to do. The next day my mom was shocked at how my little tummy got so big. Then she discovered that I had eaten five big pancakes. All night my mom worried that I may be sick, and yet I lived through it. I clung to my mother’s neck as she carried me up into the bedrooms, and I would not let go until she put me into my crib.

My mom was a good mother. She loved me and taught me about Jesus, but sad to say, I wasn’t always a nice little girl or have Jesus in my heart. I used to get so angry at my mom and brother, and I also stole. What made it worse was that I lied to my mom. It made her sad and Jesus, too, but thank God my mom did not give up on me. She did a lot of praying for me, and God answered her prayers. I asked Jesus into my heart when I was sixteen and was baptized.

I used to wonder why God spared my life and not my mom’s, but now I know why, because He wanted to use me to tell others of Him. I really do like children and they like me. My mom did some babysitting, and I helped her with the children. When I was twenty-eight, I helped take care of three foster children. I enjoyed it a lot. I sang Jesus songs with them and read stories to them. They enjoyed it, too. I become an aunt when I was seven and a half year old. I do not mind being an aunt, because I love my nieces and nephews. The only thing is that they all grew big and tall and I stayed short. But that’s OK.

I left home when I was twenty-nine and went to work up at Laurelbrook Academy. I worked at the nursing home doing different things. I also worked in the garden with some of the students. I also worked at the day care. I enjoyed doing that. I also helped out in Sabbath School with the little children.

Sarah Today

Sarah as she is today

Now I am thirty-one and married, and I know God will still use me as long as I am willing to be used. It does not make any difference how big or small or how old you are or what your background is or was. He can and wants to use you to help others to be ready when Jesus comes. May my story be an encouragement that God does work things out in our lives for His good. One of my favorite Bible verses is “All things work out together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to His purpose.” Romans 8:28

May God bless you,
Sarah Johnston

ICC Story To Be Told On The Hope Channel

Tuesday, February 7th, 2012

Amazing things can result from what seem at the time to be simple occurrences. In the summer of 2011, Doug Congleton, ICC’s executive director, was asked to give an impromptu presentation to a small group of people interested in learning about International Children’s Care.

One of those at the presentation somehow had some connection with Pastor Don Schneider, former president of the North American Division of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church and currently host of the “Really Living” television show broadcast on the Hope Channel. This person contacted Pastor Schneider and strongly suggested that he interview Doug about ICC for “Really Living.”

Pastor Don Schneider of the "Really Living" TV show broadcast on the Hope Channel

Pastor Don Schneider

During the next week Pastor Schneider contacted Doug at ICC’s home office in Vancouver, WA, and after just a few minutes of conversation, was convinced that he should dedicate a full hour of his show to interviewing Doug and learning the story of ICC. Arrangements were then made to bring Doug and Daniel Ixcot, ICC’s marketing director for ICC Mexico, to the studios of Adventist Media Productions in Simi Valley, CA, to film the interview for broadcast.

The set of really living at Adventist Media Productions in Simi Valley, CA.

The "Really Living" set at Adventist Media Productions

Pastor Schneider was deeply moved as both Doug and Daniel first told their stories of how they were each called to ICC’s ministry, and then as they each went on to relate their own personal “favorite experiences” from ICC’s amazing ministry.

We know you’ll want to see this special and touching episode of “Really Living” with Doug and Daniel so please make a note of these dates and times. This episode is due to premiere on Friday, March 9, 2012, at 7 PM Eastern on the Hope Channel. It will air again that same day at 10 PM Eastern. Subsequent airings will be on Saturday, March 10, at 5 PM and Monday, March 12 at 7 AM. Don’t miss it!

Then and Now

Friday, November 11th, 2011

Don’t you enjoy looking through old family photo albums? It’s heart warming seeing how children grow through the years—similar facial features, recognizable, yet they’re much taller.

In 2003, shortly after ICC Romania inaugurated its first children’s home, ICC’s volunteer extraordinaire, Dimitri Triantos, took a photo of some of our children holding a banner from Stichting Internationale Kinderhulp, our Dutch partner. Dimitri’s son, Lambro, recently visited the ICC Romania children’s village and captured a similar pose with the same children now eight years older!

Our children from Romania in 2003

Our children in 2003

It’s rewarding to witness the changes and growth in these children. As well, it’s a testimony to the type of program ICC operates, where children experience the love and security they need to grow and develop over time. ICC’s programs are all about longevity, the long-term, the sustaining effort. How else can children thrive?

The children from Romania in 2011

Our children in 2011

Thank-you for joining us in the long-term support of ICC children. Without you and other faithful partners, these pictures and this ministry simply would not exist.

ICC—It’s not charity… It’s family!

ICC Student Wins First Place in Speech Contest

Thursday, October 6th, 2011

For the past few years the local court in Poptún has conducted a contest for area schools. The court chooses a topic associated with the law, and schools send a student participant to give a talk on the chosen topic.  First, second and third place awards are given. This year one of ICC’s boys who attends ICAP won first place with his presentation on “Femicide” (killing women with or without a reason). This gave him the privilege of being a “judge for a day.”

The student from ICAP who won the speaking contest and the judge in who's court he was an observer

The Los Pinos student (on the right) who attends ICAP and who won the speaking contest. The first place prize was spending the day in court observing a judge at work. The judge in who's court he was an observer is on the left.

Monday, October 3, was his day to be at the court. He was a spectator for all the hearings that occurred that day. What a blessing it is that our ICC young people are learning and achieving skill in public speaking! And what a blessing that ICC Los Pinos continues to be as a refuge for children in desperate need of love and protection.

New Zealand ICC Chapter Established

Friday, July 29th, 2011

[This post was updated on 02 Aug 2011]

It is with pleasure that we welcome ICC New Zealand (ICC NZ) as the latest chapter within the ICC family. ICC NZ is now registered with the New Zealand Charities Commission.

Four trustees have graciously accepted appointments to the new chapter. They are Paul Devine, who has been appointed director; Margaret Saunders who has been appointed Secretary-Treasurer; Pastor Neil Thompson, who is responsible for marketing and Mr. Brent Ennor. ICC NZ has opened a bank account, and Pastor Thompson is working on the marketing material which will soon be ready for distribution. Once this material is prepared, the trustees plan to share the news about ICC NZ around the two Adventist conferences in New Zealand. They tell us that service to others is their motivation.

Here is more background information about the trustees of ICC NZ.

Margaret Saunders of ICC's New Zealand Chapter

Margaret Saunders

Margaret and her husband, Owen, run a successful farming business in the South Island.  Owen is also chairman of the local Adventist Church School Board and chairman of the Bainfield Adventist Charitable Trust in Invercargill, that provides residential care for 50 people. The Trust also provides financial assistance for child and youth-orientated needs in New Zealand. Margaret has been on two ICC Cambodia mission trips, while Owen has been on three, all coordinated by ICC Australia.

Neil Thompson of ICC's New Zealand Chapter

Neil Thompson

Pastor Neil Thompson is the New Zealand Union Conference Youth Leader based in Christchurch. Neil knew Merilyn Beveridge, former ICC Australia Director, from his work as a youth leader in Victoria, Australia. Neil is strongly committed to ICC and its mission and has also been on two mission trips to Cambodia, both of which were coordinated by ICC Australia.

Brent Ennor is a successful businessman based in Christchurch, New Zealand. Brent has a heart to help others less fortunate than himself. He has set up a trust called Mainland Christian Foundation. This is designed to assist South Island students to attend the church’s tertiary institution, Avondale College, in Australia and to assist local churches also.

Brent Ennor of ICC's New Zealand Chapter

Brent Ennor

In addition Brent’s eldest son and daughter in-law are actively involved in areas of the third world. Jessica works for ADRA based in Sydney, Australia, after completing an undergraduate degree in International Development. Reuben was one of the photographers for the recent Asian Aid documentary and has just returned from Africa and Asia as part of consultancy on media for ADRA Australia. Reuben is a very talented, creative photographer. This exposure through his family has provided Brent an insight into third world countries and their needs.

Paul Devine of ICC's New Zealand Chapter

Paul Devine

Paul Devine became involved with ICC a few years ago when Pastor Neil heard that Merilyn and Don Beveridge where traveling to South New Zealand and were looking for someone willing to accept the responsibility of starting an ICC chapter in that country. Neil was Paul’s church pastor at the time, and he suggested to him that this might be a challenge he would enjoy. Pastor Neil arranged a meeting between Merilyn and Paul. Since that meeting, plans have been underway to start a New Zealand chapter for ICC.

Paul and his wife Shirley worked for 6 years in the Western Pacific Union Mission based on Guadalcanal, in the Solomon Islands. As part of Paul’s work as the WPUM Education Director, he traveled through the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Kiribati visiting schools and staying in the villages with the local population. As part of his role he also traveled through Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Hong Kong, Bangkok and Singapore. Later as a principal of a boarding school in New Zealand, Paul also traveled through parts of Malaysia, Taiwan and Japan.

All four of the trustees have bought into the way ICC operates its orphanages, which they see as a model that offers children the example of how a family was designed to operate. They also strongly believe in the micro-finance programs initiated in various Asia/Pacific countries where ICC has children’s villages.

New Zealand is a very small country, with a population of around 4.5 million. There is a Seventh-day Adventist Church membership of approximately 11,000. Operating a charity within guidelines of the New Zealand government can be a challenge. According to Paul Devine, “For a donor to receive tax deductibility, 50% or more must be spent in New Zealand. As we intend that all our money is to go overseas, minus administration costs, you can see we have a problem. As a result we plan to work with ADRA NZ on some joint development projects.

Paul says that after ICC NZ has developed a track record over several years, “the system” allows them to approach a member of parliament and ask them to sponsor ICC NZ when new entities are being considered for tax deductibility purposes. If approved then all donations would be tax deductible. This is their medium-term target.

It is a blessing to have ICC New Zealand join the ICC family! We look forward to watching and supporting the development of this chapter.

Thanks for reading!

Kent Greve

International Development Director ICC

Agriculture—Reaping the Benefits

Wednesday, July 13th, 2011

The agriculture programs at ICC’s children’s villages are busy with activity this summer. One such program is at the Fountain of Life Children’s Village. Recently we received an update about their first harvest of plantains. Felix, the project director, reports that “In one month we’ll be harvesting continuously, and we’ll be able to sell some of the harvest—not in great quantity, but we will no longer be buying and we’ll start getting some income.”

Plantains that are part of the first harvest from our farm at the Fuente de Vida Children's Village in Nicaragua

The First of the First. The first plantains to be harvested at the ICC Nicaragua farm.

Agriculture is such a vital part of our ICC children’s villages. It benefits the children in so many positive ways by providing a balanced diet, practical work experience, and income from the sale of extra produce. However, there are subtle benefits as well.

This child from the Fuente de Vida Children's Village in Nicaragua helps to harvest a bunch of plantains almost as big as he is!

This child from the Fuente de Vida Children's Village in Nicaragua helps to harvest a bunch of plantains almost as big as he is!

Imagine a young child being rescued from life on the streets. He has no concept of the safety and security of a home and family, and begging food may be how he survives. Now, place that same child in an ICC village and give him love, security and nutritious meals.

Take him to the garden and patiently teach him about the ways of plants. Let him prepare the soil for planting, sow seeds, and wait expectantly for sunshine and rain. Watch him search day-by-day for the first tiny leaf to poke through the soil. Help him care for the tender plant and harvest the first fruits of diligent labor.

Then teach him about his Heavenly Father who loves and cares for him and who has a plan for him to grow and develop and bear fruit. With such therapy, an orphan child cannot help but gain a positive sense of belonging. And when that occurs, the orphan is no longer really an orphan and can grow to his or her full potential just like a well cared for plant in the garden.

You can see from these pictures that the plantain crop is well cared for in Nicaragua. The children have much for which to be thankful, and because you care, we are able to care. Your investment in the children’s programs of ICC enables agriculture programs like the one in Nicaragua to flourish.

On behalf of the children, thank-you for your continued support,

Kent Greve
International Development Director ICC

Violent Storm Damages Las Palmas Crops

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

We’ve received some disturbing news from Mario Lora, ICC’s business and farm manager at the Las Palmas Campus in the Dominican Republic. On Friday, May 27 an isolated and violent storm swept through the Las Palmas campus and caused extensive damage to the farm crops which had been growing in such abundance.

Weather forecasts had not predicted the storm, and it hit the campus unexpectedly and with terrific force. According to Mario, “Its radius of action was practically in our locality and towards the mountains. In fact, the nearby city of Bonao had no damage.

“We understand that it affected an area of about 10 square kilometers with us in the center. We haven’t heard anything about it on the news, and everyone who comes here is surprised when they see the destruction.

“In fact, one of the engineers in charge of the greenhouse project, when he came here was stunned because he didn’t know this had happened, and he was investigating a lot to see what happened. It was quick, only lasting about 20 to 25 minutes as a strong storm, and then the rain lasted for a long time afterward. There was no warning to prepare.”

Plantain trees from the Las Palmas farm destroyed by a focused storm.

Some of the destroyed plantain trees from the Las Palmas farm

About 2/3 of the plantain crop was damaged by the heavy winds and rain that accompanied the storm. Many of the trees were laden with plantains and according to Mario, “With a few exceptions, all trees that had stalks (bunches) of plantains fell to the ground. The stalks varied a lot, from ones that were just flowering to those that were ready to harvest.

Of the trees that didn’t have stalks, only a few fell to the ground, but a very small percentage. We think that about 2,500 plantain trees fell over. Each stalk has about 30 to 40 plantains, which at the current market price are worth between 5 and 7 pesos, so each stalk is worth about 150 pesos [$4.05]. When we multiply that by 2,500 trees, it comes out to a loss of about 375,000 pesos [$10,135]. Also, we were left with about 1,250 trees which will start flowering in the next three months.”

The loss of the trees means more than the loss of the crop. A tree can produce several crops, plus they produce other “children” – small trees that grow up to the next generation. Mario, the staff and children at Las Palmas have quickly started the process of rehabilitating trees that can be salvaged and planting new trees.

Mario states that, “when we plant a new crop it takes about 8 or 9 months to start producing.” One piece of good news is that the project already has enough seeds to do the replanting and together with rehabilitating the damaged trees, the project should be able to expand the crop. This will have to wait until the rains allow the workers to prepare the land.

Plantains are a staple crop at the children’s village. This loss will certainly impact the project. Mario continues. “Of the production that we had projected, we consume almost the entire crop. What was happening at this moment was that as the plantains would get ripe we would cut them for use in the homes. They were not all ready to cut at the same time. In fact, many times we have had to cut them before they were really ready because of the needs in the homes.”

One of the other important crops at Las Palmas is Yucca. Mario estimated that perhaps 30% to 40% was affected. Since Yucca are tubers, it’s difficult to say at this time what the effect of the storm may be. However, there was significant damage to the plants themselves and the tubers may rot or not develop normally.

Garden vegetables were also hit hard, and according to Mario, “everything we had was ruined.” The house father and children of house 4 on the Las Palmas campus had put forth dedicated effort to supply the homes with vegetables. Mario estimates that this was valued at the equivalent of $135 per week so over the next 8 weeks as they wait for new crops to mature, they’ll need to spend about $1,080 to replace what was lost.

Two hatchlings sleep in their nest after the storm.

Two hatchlings sleep in their nest after the storm

There are some bright spots in all this discouraging news. All the children and staff escaped unharmed. Praise God for that! Also, the sweet potato, corn and pineapple crops were not damaged. As well, there is something telling about how Mario describes the attitude of the staff and children on campus. “What has impressed me the most in all this,” he states, “is the good spirit that exists among the employees and the kids. We can see complete unity in order to reestablish, with God’s help and our efforts, what has been damaged. We have courage to continue on as long as the Lord gives us the strength.”

We’re pleased to report that when the Versacare Foundation heard about this tragedy, they immediately provided a donation of $10,000 to help with this food emergency. What a blessing this is! Additional funds are needed, and if you would like to help, please mark your donation “Las Palmas Farm and Food Fund.” It will directly assist with this need.

Thank you for your generous support.

Kent Greve
Director International Development ICC